+0
In a book titled "Loving God" by Charles Colson, in its section titled How It All Began: An introduction, the third paragraph in page 13 reads as follows:

Popular literature rides the wave with best-selling titles that gurantee success with everything from making money to firming flabby thighs. This not-so-maginificent obsession to "find ourselves" has spawned a whole set of counterfeit values; we worship fame, success, materialism, and celebrity. We want to "live for success" as we "look out for number one," and we don't mind "winning through intimidation."

There are four quoted contents and I don't know why they are in quotes. Basically, I think you need to use quotes if 1) it is something someone said, and 2) if one is using a word or phrase in an unusal or strange sense and I wonder which one might apply here. Help.

Why quotes here?
"find ourselves" -- why
"live for success" -- why?
"look out for number one" -- why?
"winning through intimidation" -- why?
Comments  
.
Why quotes here?-- These are all cliches, and the writer wishes to highlight them as such.
.
Thank you. So, I think you are saying it is OK to use quotation marks to high light cliches. Can you tell me with what, beside cliches, we can highlight? I think italicizing is generally what is recommended for stressing and possibly highlighting.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
.
Can you tell me with what, beside cliches, we can highlight?-- Words used in unusual ways or which the writer wishes to bring focus upon qua the words themselves.

I think italicizing is generally what is recommended for stressing and possibly highlighting. -- Italics ad quotation marks are two ways to do both of these. When such guidelines were promulgated, only publishers had italic typeset; the rest of us had to make do with underlining or quotation marks.
.
Thank you, again. Is "qua" in your response sentence a typo?

Your response:

Can you tell me with what, beside cliches, we can highlight?-- Words used in unusual ways or which the writer wishes to bring focus upon qua the words themselves.
.
No.

qua (adver): as; as being; in the character or capacity of: 'The work of art qua art can be judged by aesthetic criteria only'.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I disagree with you guys. I think that the reason why these are in quotation marks is to point out that most self-help books say these same things, not because they're cliches (though I believe that they are all cliches).