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But, that is most definitely true of costume jewelery from the 1930s what now sells for hundred’s of pounds .
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"which now sells for hundreds of pounds" is a so-called relative clause. It modifies (gives more information about) "jewelery from the 1930s". Relative clauses are introduced by "which", "that", "who(m)" or "whose", not by "what". (Where I live, some people actually do sometimes use "what". For example, they might say something like "the money what you owe me". This is bad English.)

Apostrophe-s is for possessives. For example, "I accidentally trod on my cat's tail". It means the tail belonging to the cat. "hundreds" in your sentence needs to be a plural, not a possessive. There is nothing belonging to "hundred".
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GPY"which now sells for hundreds of pounds" is a so-called relative clause. It modifies (gives more information about) "jewelery from the 1930s". Relative clauses are introduced by "which", "that", "who(m)" or "whose", not by "what". (Where I live, some people actually do sometimes use "what". For example, they might say something like "the money what you owe me". This is bad English.)Apostrophe-s is for possessives. For example, "I accidentally trod on my cat's tail". It means the tail belonging to the cat. "hundreds" in your sentence needs to be a plural, not a possessive. There is nothing belonging to "hundred".
But, that is most definitely true of costume jewelery from the 1930s what now sells for hundred’s of pounds and increasingly popular in Europe.
I forgot to write the rest of the sentence. Do I need to write and is increasingly popular (to add a verb before the adverb)? or I can leave it as it is?
tnikBut, that is most definitely true of costume jewelery from the 1930s what now sells for hundred’s of pounds and increasingly popular in Europe.
You have not corrected any of the mistakes that GPY showed you. Please do so and post your corrected sentence here.
But, that is most definitely true of costume jewelery from the 1930s what (Mistake)
now sells for hundred’s (Mistake) of pounds and (mistake - missing verb) increasingly popular in Europe.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Mister Micawber tnikBut, that is most definitely true of costume jewelery from the 1930s what now sells for hundred’s of pounds and increasingly popular in Europe.You have not corrected any of the mistakes that GPY showed you. Please do so and post your corrected sentence here.
I have found these errors in the text could you please tell me if they are right?

It may seem a little ridiculous to think, that people deliberatly buy imitations. But, that is most definatly true of costume jewellery from the 1930s what now sells for hundred’s of pounds and increasingly popular in America and Europe. The term ‘costume jewellery’ is relatively new, but such jewelry has been around since the people first decorated themselves with bones and shells. The Romans, in particular took delight in making imitation jewells from glass and ceramics and combine them with valueable stones. The eighteenth century saw an improvment with the arrival of hand cut-glass, now refered to as paste’. Besides, the realy exiting revolution in costume jewellery is attributed to french designer Coco Chanel, who turned away from pure imitation off previous designs in favour of jewellery made to be valued in it’s own right. She even accomodated plastics in her designs, producing colors and shapes never seen before. A few years ago, her pieces could of been brought relativley cheaply, now they are in great demand and consequently extremely expensive. No way your ever going to find one in a fleamarket!

think, that: think that (no comma, that clauses always convey essential information about their subjects and don’t take commas)
deliberatly: deliberately (spelling mistake)
but, that: but that (no comma)

definatly: definitely (spelling mistake)

from the 1930s: , (we need a comma after the year.)
what: which (which is a so called relative clause. It gives more information about jewellery)
hundred’s: hundreds ( when we form a plural for nouns there is no need to add an apostrophe.)
and increasingly: and is increasingly (verb is needed before the adverb)
, but : (No comma before but. We can use comma before but if it introduces an independent sentence)
jewelry: jewellery (jewelery is the preferred spelling in American English, we can’t mix dialects)
the people: without the ( people in general not any specific people)
in particular took: in particular, took (in particular should be separated by comma)
jewells: jewels (spelling mistake)
combine:combining (take delight in + verbing/n)
valueable: valuable (spelling mistake)
Improvment: Improvement (spelling mistake)
Refered: referred (spelling mistake)
paste’: ‘paste’

Besides the realy : The real revolution instead of Besides, the really exciting revolution , because besides is not appropriate in formal writing style
french: French

turned away: turned it away. It refers to costume jewellery
imitation off: imitation of
it’s own: its own

accomodated : accommodated
could of : could have
brought : bought
No way: It is not possible to find one in a flea market. Because no way in more informal

your ever : you're ever

fleamarket: flea market
tnikthink, that: think that (no comma, that clauses always convey essential information about their subjects and don’t take commas)
Correct answer but faulty reasoning.
tnikbut, that: but that (no comma)
A comma is not wrong. It is optional.
tnikfrom the 1930s: , (we need a comma after the year.)
No comma.
tnik, but : (No comma before but. We can use comma before but if it introduces an independent sentence)
In this case, it does introduce an independent clause.
tnikjewelry: jewellery (jewelery is the preferred spelling in American English, we can’t mix dialects)
So is the writing British or American English? "jewelery" is not a valid spelling in either dialect.
tnikbecause besides is not appropriate in formal writing style
Besides as a transition word is perfectly acceptable in formal writing. It is not an appropriate choice in this context. It is used when you are adding another stronger reason to support what you are saying. This is a factual, not argumentative essay. You are not proving a point.

"Really" is an informal word. There is another spelling mistake that you missed.
tnikturned away: turned it away. It refers to costume jewellery
No.
The phrasal verb is "turned away from."
AlpheccaStars tnik think, that: think that (no comma, that clauses always convey essential information about their subjects and don’t take commas)Correct answer but faulty reasoning.
is it because they are two separate sentences so need to be separated? we need to stop before the second sentence? can you tell me what's the right reason?
but, that: but that (no comma)A comma is not wrong. It is optional.
the 1930s: , (we need a comma after the year.)No comma.tnik
,but : (No comma before but. We can use comma before but if it introduces an independent sentence) In this case, it does introduce an independent clause.
tnik so can I leave it as it is?
jewelry: jewellery (jewelery is the preferred spelling in American English, we can’t mix dialects)So is the writing British or American English? "jewelery" is not a valid spelling in either dialect.
the text is British English
besides is not appropriate in formal writing style Besides as a transition word is perfectly acceptable in formal writing. It is not an appropriate choice in this context. It is used when you are adding another stronger reason to support what you are saying. This is a factual, not argumentative essay. You are not proving a point. "Really" is an informal word.
There is another spelling mistake that you missed.
is another mistake realy: really (spelling mistake)?
turned away: turned it away. It refers to costume jewelleryNo.The phrasal verb is "turned away from."
I know turned away from is a phrasal verb but I think I need to add it as a pronoun?
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tnikis it because they are two separate sentences so need to be separated? we need to stop before the second sentence? can you tell me what's the right reason?
It may seem a little ridiculous to think, that people deliberately buy imitations.

The underlined clause is the complement (object) of the verb "think." It is wrong to put a comma between the verb and its complement (object.)
eg,
It is ridiculous to think that. (correct)
I like my car. (correct)
It is ridiculous to think, that. (incorrect).
I like, my car. (incorrect).
tnikis another mistake realy: really (spelling mistake)?
realy exiting revolution (Two spelling mistakes.)
tnikI know turned away from is a phrasal verb but I think I need to add it as a pronoun?
...who turned away from pure imitation of previous designs

The underlined is the complement of "turn away from". http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/turn-away-from

It means that she decided not to imitate previous designs; she created new designs.
Why do you think a pronoun is required?
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