Why is it so annoying when people use incorrect grammar or spelling ? Seeing signs like "Orange's for sale" or hearing someone say "This must be the most unique game in history" really goes against the grain for me.

It makes sense to react to someone using completely the wrong word (a friend recently described someone as being "very sureal" - he actually meant "serene" :-) - but if it is still possible to understand what they are saying, why such a strong reaction ?
David Fisher
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Why is it so annoying when people use incorrect grammar or spelling ? Seeing signs like "Orange's for sale" or ... :-) - but if it is still possible to understand what they are saying, why such a strong reaction ?

Judging from your first paragraph, you are well qualified to answer that question. I have a question of my own why the space before your question marks?

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Why is it so annoying when people use incorrect grammar ... what they are saying, why such a strong reaction ?

Judging from your first paragraph, you are well qualified to answer that question. I have a question of my own why the space before your question marks?

Maybe he's French !
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Why is it so annoying when people use incorrect grammar ... game in history" really goes against the grain for me.

(snip)
Judging from your first paragraph, you are well qualified to answer that question. I have a question of my own why the space before yourquestion marks?

Just a habit ... it looks kind of nicer to me to be more spaced out. Why the double dashes ? :-)
To slightly alter the original question: It doesn't seem all that reasonable for me to get upset about other people's mistakes in English if I can still understand them, but I do. Why do I (and lots of other people) do that ?

David Fisher
Sydney, Australia (not France !)
(snip)

Judging from your first paragraph, you are well qualified to ... my own why the space before your question marks?

Just a habit ... it looks kind of nicer to me to be more spaced out. Why the double dashes ? :-)

Them's hyphens. With the font I'm using, it takes two to indicate a dash.
To slightly alter the original question: It doesn't seem all that reasonable for me to get upset about other people's mistakes in English if I can still understand them, but I do. Why do I (and lots of other people) do that ?

Well, you still fully qualify to answer that, don't you?

All I can say is "See how you are?" I don't know about the other people.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
His font lacks dashes, so he simulates a dash with two hyphens.

John Varela
(Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)
I apologize for munging the address but the spam was too much.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
(snip)

But it's not a double dash, it's a single dash represented by a double hyphen. That is the rule that I and other Americans were taught when we learned typing. However, I was taught to leave no space before or after the double hyphen.
See
http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~sfagan/keyboarding.htm
To slightly alter the original question: It doesn't seem all thatreasonable for me to get upset about other people's mistakes ... I do. Why do I (and lots of other people) do that ? David Fisher Sydney, Australia (not France !)

There is an article in the current edition of the Skeptical Inquirer which discusses the theory that religion arises out of natural mental processes. The rituals and rules in religion related to purity and pollution, for example, are compared to the rituals of those who suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), which disorder is itself likely the result of a natural response being exaggerated. The advantage of the natural impulse is that it helps us avoid certain dangers the bite of a poisonous spider, for example. Perhaps the strong reaction some of us have to such little things as a slight mispronunciation or an odd use of punctuation has the same source, or some other natural mental process, such as the desire for order (which also can be exaggerated in OCD).

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
(snip)

It is because you live in Australia where you are subjected to more bad grammar than any reasonable person can stand.
As opposed to what one is subjected to in New Zealand?

Christopher
My e-mail address is not 'munged' in any way and is fully replyable!
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