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It's so confusing...

I thought it is a general abstract concept, without any sense of definiteveness. Is there a general rule when a abstract general noun becomes definite without any particular reason?

Cheers,
Al.
Comments  
I don't know if there's a general rule, but in this specific case the money supply refers to the money supply of some particular country or to the international money supply. The writer assumes that the context gives enough information so that the reader will know exactly which money supply is being referred to. Remember: "the" is used to forestall the question "Which?" The writer obviously thinks there is no question which money supply is being referred to, and that the reader can easily figure out for himself which it is.

CJ
SomethingsimpleI thought it is a general abstract concept, without any sense of definiteveness. Is there a general rule when a abstract general noun becomes definite without any particular reason?
Googlily "money supply" without THE hits 1,470,000 pages whereas "the money supply" with THE hits 1,040,000 pages.

paco
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Paco2004Googlily "money supply" without THE hits 1,470,000 pages whereas "the money supply" with THE hits 1,040,000 pages.
Oh well, some time ago I decided to use neither google, nor such arguably reliable sources of the grammatically correct English as bbc.co.uk. The reason is probably more incorrect usages than the correct ones. Bbc specifically disappointed me so much, but I guess I can understand why their editorial policy is sort of lax - too large an organisation, with limited printing involved.

So, nowdays I am primarily using nytimes.com or economist.com, something which appears in print and thus has to go through thorough proof reading before they put it online. So if we take nytimes.com than we get 1667 for 'money supply' and 1286 for 'the money supply'. But the former will obviously include the second term as a subset. So...

Cheers,
Al.
Hello

You may be right that the number of the uses of a phrase on the whole Google often does not reflect the right usage of the phrase. I too choose "NY Times.com" and "Gutenberg.org" or "AC.UK" when I doubt the result of a survey over the whole Google.

As to the phrase "money supply" (without THE) and "the money supply" (with THE), NYTimes.com gives 552 pages for the former and 365 pages for the latter. The domain AC.UK gives 12,200 pages for the former and 13,900 pages for the latter.

paco
paco,

what's ac.uk? I don't seem to get there when typing it as a url. My IE is not finding it on the net.
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CalifJimI don't know if there's a general rule, but in this specific case the money supply refers to the money supply of some particular country or to the international money supply. The writer assumes that the context gives enough information so that the reader will know exactly which money supply is being referred to. Remember: "the" is used to forestall the question "Which?" The writer obviously thinks there is no question which money supply is being referred to, and that the reader can easily figure out for himself which it is.
Hi CalifJim,

You are probably right, but looking at the whole paragraph, I can't seem to find what you are referring to. And yes, it is in the first paragraph in the text.


Once, a central banker who did not believe in monetarism would have been viewed as equivalent to a priest who admits to being an atheist. A quarter of a century ago, control of money was seen as both necessary and sufficient to curb inflation--so most central banks set monetary targets. Monetarism has since become unfashionable. Financial deregulation and innovation made the money supply harder to interpret, let alone control. As the link between money and prices seemingly broke down, central banks scrapped money targets and instead focused on inflation directly.
The context seems to be a very general economic theory in which just abstract concepts are discussed without any reference to a particular country, or the international money supply. Do you know what I am getting wrong again?

Cheers,
Al.
Somethingsimple what's ac.uk? I don't seem to get there when typing it as a url. My IE is not finding it on the net.
"ac.uk" is the sign of one of UK's domains for academic use.

Type <"money supply" -"the money supply" site:ac.uk> (actually don't put "<" and ">"), then you will get the number of pages in ac.uk domain in which "money supply" (unmodified by THE) is used.

paco