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I'm a pretty decent writer and editor, but I've been told I have a speech flaw: I say "these ones." Apparently, it's a great sin agin' the English language. Before I rewire my brain against the phrase, can someone please explain the logic to me? Why is it acceptable to pluralize "one" when referring to "loved ones," etc., but not when saying "these ones, as a pluralized form of "this one?" Enlighten me!

-Christine
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HI Source,
Well, I don't see you as sinful at all. 'These ones' seems like acceptable everyday usage, acceptable grammar and acceptable meaning to me.
Perhaps whoever told you this is thinking that you can't have 'two ones' as some sort of mathematical offence. To me, 'one' here really refers to 'a unit' so 'these ones' essentially means 'these units'.
Perhaps others have a different opinion?

Go and sin no more,
Clive
Thanks for your thoughts. Yet, shockingly, all the grammar websites I've checked claim that it is indeed an offense. I'm just looking for the logic behind it...
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Strange indeed:

I'll take this.
I'll take this one.
I'll take this big. (X)
I'll take this big one.
I'll take these.
I'll take these ones. (?) (In my grammar book called forbidden in AmE and unusual in BrE-- quite unusual in itself)
I'll take these big. (X)
I'll take these big ones.
It's not a matter of logic. It's just "not done"!

Not very enlightening, I'm afraid. Emotion: smile

When you know more than one person agrees with you, but not exactly who, do you say "Well, at least someones agree with me"?

Same illogic! Emotion: smile
Thanks for your input. I'm now making a concerted effort to improve. Appreciate everyone's feedback. I love grammar emails, especially these ones (just kidding).

Best,

Source Ed.
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Being constantly irritated by the frequent use of 'these ones' and 'them ones', I thought I would look into the origin as I have only been aware of these words being used together within the last, maybe, ten years. At first I passed it off as the language of the same rough individuals who have also brought much worse 'slang' to the forefront in the English vocabulary in the last decade ;¬/ and that also appears to have been ‘accepted’ by the

I have also heard the higher 'intelligentsia' of the population also using this same grammatical gaffe!

I was taught 'this one' - singular item reference as in "I would like this one and that one please", 'these' - multiples as in "I would like these not those"...........where do you need ones?? Just makes the person sound uneducated......but that is only my opinion, or maybe not having read the previous comments. Apologies if it is in your vocabulary and think otherwise.
Anonymous Just makes the person sound uneducated
Or British. It's apparently common in Britain and considered completely grammatical and proper. Use the search box above. Enter these ones and you'll be directed to many more discussions of the subject, if you're interested.

CJ
Christine, I have been having this battle for more than 25 years with my husband. He too uses the phrase "these ones" and does so without giving it a second thought. Make no mistake, I am not, nor do I profess to be, a grammar guru. My argument - right or wrong - is that the phrase "these ones" is duplicitous. It is enough (and quite complete) to simply say "these".
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