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“The two of them looked out, to where I am now, and they watched two boys walk up the street”
Excerpt FromThirteen Reasons WhyJay AsherThis material may be protected by copyright.
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Hasibul Alamwatched two boys walk up the street

'watch' is a catenative verb. It takes a plain form or an -ing form.

In this way it is like other verbs of perception like see and hear.

Thus, the following are all correct.

They watched the boys walk up the street.
They watched the boys walking up the street.
They saw the boys walk up the street.
They saw the boys walking up the street.
They heard the boys walk up the stairs.
They heard the boys walking up the stairs.

CJ

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Hasibul Alam“The two of them looked out, to where I am now, and they watched two boys walk up the street”

Read CJ's post.

Here is a variation of the sentence with the past form of "walk". It makes a dependent clause rather than a catenative structure. The meaning is different.

The two of them looked out, to where I am now, and they watched as two boys walked up the street.


It is similar to "help", but "help" does not take the v-ing form.
I helped the boys carry their books.