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Hi,
Would you please explain to me that why this phrase is not correct?

"too much hot to drink"

Thanks,
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too much + [adjective] is not a valid pattern in English. Leave out 'much'.

too hot to drink.

CJ
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Hi Jim,
Thank you kindly,
What about "much too + [adjective]"?

And would you please tell me what would you translate "too much + [adjective]"? I mean what funny meaning would it have when you, as a native English speaker, read it? Sincerely, I would like to understand that. Sorry to take your time.

Thanks,
PaeezWhat about "much too + [adjective]"?
That's valid in English.

much too hot to drink.
Paeez "too much + [adjective]"? I mean what funny meaning would it have
If a native speaker said it, I might think he was purposely imitating a foreigner who was very bad at speaking English just to be comical and get a laugh.
If a non-native speaker said it, I would think that the speaker hasn't learned much English yet.

CJ
Thank you for trying to clear that up. "too much" pattern is very familiar to my ears, I guess because it is used with noun with emotion, mostly, and when it comes with adjectives it is quite tricky for tests. I don't have the sense of distinguishing between correct usage and incorrect usage, yet - I mean a real-time process in my mind. However, you have been very helpful.
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too much + [noun] is OK (with an uncountable noun)

too much sugar; too much money; too much jam; too much water

But not with an adjective: too much hot; too much long; too much high

CJ
I really appreciate that. Thank you for continuing help me.

What do you think about this?

"too + adjective + to verb" is OK.

I was thinking about "It is hot to drink", and it was occurred to me that the meaning of "too" is somehow embedded in the "hot" when it is used in such structures. Similarly, other adjectives too.

I think when we use "too much", "too" is describing "much". And when we use that structure before a to verb we are forcing the adjective to not having the embedded meaning of "too". In contrast, when we are using "much too", we are actually describing "too" with "much", so the meaning is still have "too" that means exceeding the presumed limit.

I would like to know your opinion about my thinking.

Thanks,
Paeez"too + adjective + to verb" is OK.
Correct.
PaeezI was thinking about "It is hot to drink", and it was occurred to me that the meaning of "too" is somehow embedded in the "hot" when it is used in such structures. Similarly, other adjectives too.
In English the meaning of "too" is not embedded in "hot", "long", and so on. There are other languages where the meaning of "too" is embedded in structures like hot to drink, and maybe your native language has that grammatical pattern, but it's not like that in English.
PaeezI think when we use "too much", "too" is describing "much"
much by itself is 'a great amount'; too much is 'an excessive amount' (an amount greater than desired or required).

too hot is 'hotter than desired'; much too hot is 'much hotter than desired' (a much greater amount of heat than desired).

CJ
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Thank you again, so the sentence "It is hot to drink" is not correct? If it is, when someone says that sentence, what does the listener think in his mind? I didn't assumed that in everywhere "hot" has a embedded "too", but only in such structures it can be understood that the drink is hot to drink or it is too had to drink. And in my language, when someone says "The tea or coffee is hot to drink", that could have two meanings: 1. It is good, and hot, you can drink it.(50%) 2. It is too hot to drink, wait until it gets cooler.(50%)

I guessed that perhaps in English, it has only the second meaning, so it is funny.

Dear Jim, I appreciate your help and I don't expect you to answer all of my question, please do not hesitate to tell me when should I stop. I don't like to bother you with my questions.

Regards,
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