How did it happen, that the English word is 'trojan' instead of 'troyan'? The city was Troy, not Troj ! I can't find any info online on what exactly made this form of the word the accepted one. (Just so you know why I ask - in other languages it /is/ 'troyan', there is no 'dzh' in sight.)

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In
How did it happen, that the English word is 'trojan' instead of 'troyan'? The city was Troy, not Troj ! ... is no 'dzh' in sight.) You'd be crazy to e-mail me with the crazy. But leave the div alone.

Probably from Latin Trojanus, where the "j" would be an "i" sound. Then becoming a spelling pronunciation.

Ray
UK
Probably from Latin Trojanus, where the "j" would be an "i" sound. Then becoming a spelling pronunciation.

I think that's right, part of the usual anglicization process; cf. Ajax (Gk. Aias), Jesus (Gk. Iesous), Janus (hence January), Juno (June), Julius (July & Jules, Julia &c.), Jacob (hence James), ... all of which had a Y or I sound in Latin.
I wonder what Trojans are called in Spanish: is there a 'hard H' or a Y sound in their version of the word? (FWIW my money would go on the former, assuming it's spelt with a J.)

Odysseus
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Probably from Latin Trojanus, where the "j" would be an "i" sound. Then becoming a spelling pronunciation.

I think that's right, part of the usual anglicization process; cf. Ajax (Gk. Aias), Jesus (Gk. Iesous), Janus (hence January), ... in their version of the word? (FWIW my money would go on the former, assuming it's spelt with a J.)

My guess would be Troyanos (but only because of the singer of that name).

Ray
UK
I wonder what Trojans are called in Spanish: is there ... go on the former, assuming it's spelt with a J.)

My guess would be Troyanos (but only because of the singer of that name).

Yup. It's Troya and Troyano/-a. They've thus stuck to the Greek Troia way of pronunciation.
BTW, "troja" is taken by another concept already.
Luca

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Probably from Latin Trojanus, where the "j" would be an "i" sound. Then becoming a spelling pronunciation.

I think that's right, part of the usual anglicization process; cf. Ajax (Gk. Aias), Jesus (Gk. Iesous), Janus (hence January), Juno (June), Julius (July & Jules, Julia &c.), Jacob (hence James), ... all of which had a Y or I sound in Latin.

That's definitely it. I feel so stupid now, not having thought of it - all these examples are, of course, with 'y' in other languages. My only attempt at excuse is that the 'y's are all at the beginning of their respective words, while "trojan"'s 'y' is not, and I didn't connect the dots.

You'd be crazy to e-mail me with the crazy. But leave the div alone.
Whoever bans a book, shall be banished. Whoever burns a book, shall burn.
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Probably from Latin Trojanus, where the "j" would be an "i" sound. Then becoming a spelling pronunciation.

I think that's right, part of the usual anglicization process; cf. Ajax (Gk. Aias), Jesus (Gk. Iesous), Janus (hence January), Juno (June), Julius (July & Jules, Julia &c.), Jacob (hence James), ... all of which had a Y or I sound in Latin.

That's definitely it. I feel so stupid now, not having thought of it - all these examples are, of course, with 'y' in other languages. My only attempt at excuse is that the 'y's are all at the beginning of their respective words, while "trojan"'s 'y' is not, and I didn't connect the dots.

You'd be crazy to e-mail me with the crazy. But leave the div alone.
Whoever bans a book, shall be banished. Whoever burns a book, shall burn.