+0
Dear teachers,

As far as I know, until now/today often go with Present perfect or past perfect, but here it's past continuous. Could you possibly help clarify the meaning of past continuous used with until now here?

She said, " Until today, I was enjoying school in spite of the work"

She said, " Until now, everything was going so well."

Is there any difference beyween" Until today, I have been enjoying school in spite of the work " and " Until today, I was enjoying school in spite of the work"?

Thank you in advance
1 2 3
Comments  (Page 3) 
Kooyeen 1) Until now, everything is going well <-- I don't like this one. I don't think I am likely to use the simple present with "until now".
Do you experience any change in sense by sticking "up" in front of it?

Up until now, everything is going well. How about as a present tense narrative style?? Up until now, everything is going well. I change into my pajamas and slip under the covers. Suddenly there's a knock at the door.
AvangiUp until now, everything is going well. I change into my pajamas and slip under the covers. Suddenly there's a knock at the door.
Hmm, maybe. I see every kind of structure in narrative styles, tenses mixed together repeatedly, so I guess I wouldn't be too surprised to read such a sentence. The only problem is when you have stories where the author is also speaking in the first person, and there are a lot of flashbacks... at it can get confusing if you don't pay attention. Emotion: smile
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi Kooyeen,

I am still confused about the meaning of the sentence below which I picked up from the Internet:

Until now, I could only use MIDI keyboard with my old PC because the traditional MIDI cable cannot attach the more recent ones.

You explain that UNTIL + PAST TENSE mean the action /situation has changed at the moment of speaking, but here I think that the author of this sentence is still using the MIDI keyboard at the time he is writing this sentence. Confusing! Could you take the trouble to explain again?

Sorry for troubling again
I take this as an example where the "old" condition being described no longer exists because of some recent change.

It's not always clear. I don't think there are any rules which will give you the right answer every time. Sometimes you have to use common sense. Sometimes you have to ask yourself, "Why is this person telling me this?"

In your present example, there's ambiguity as to whether he can't use the old keyboard with the new PC, or he can't use the new keyboard with the old PC. The English is not very good.

If you assume that the midi cable is not detachable from the keyboard, then he's saying the new computer has no midi receptacle to accept the midi plug from the old keyboard.

But NOW he has a way to do it. (For instance, either he has an adaptor, or he has yet another new PC which comes equipped with a midi receptacle.)

Edit. The verb "to attach" is usually followed by the preposition "to." It's used both transitively and intransitively.

(transitive, active voice) My mechanic attached the new license plate to my car yesterday.

(transitive, passive voice) The new license plate was attached to my car by my mechanic yesterday.

(verb "to be" + past participle as adjective) The new license plate was still attached to my car this morning.

(transitive, passive voice, past perfect tense) The new license plate had been attached to my car by my mechanic yesterday.

(intransitive) The license plate attaches to the rear bumper of the car.

(THE "TO" IS SOMETIMES OMITTED) Please attach this license plate. The bolts attach the license plate [to the bumper].