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Dear teachers,

As far as I know, until now/today often go with Present perfect or past perfect, but here it's past continuous. Could you possibly help clarify the meaning of past continuous used with until now here?

She said, " Until today, I was enjoying school in spite of the work"

She said, " Until now, everything was going so well."

Is there any difference beyween" Until today, I have been enjoying school in spite of the work " and " Until today, I was enjoying school in spite of the work"?

Thank you in advance
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Comments  
TuongvanUntil today, I have been enjoying school in spite of the work
You can't use present here. You need past perfect. Your sentence contradicts itself. "I have been" is used for a current state; "until today" is used when the state is no longer current and requires the past perfect.
Tuongvan Is there any difference beyween" Until today, I have been enjoying school in spite of the work " and " Until today, I was enjoying school in spite of the work"?
present perfect continus vs. past continuous.

In your first example the enjoyment may still be continuing. In your second example, the implication is more strongly that the enjoyment has stopped.

To suggest that the enjoyment has stopped with the "perfect continuous," you must switch to "past perfect continuous":

"Until today, I had been enjoying school in spite of the work."

If you wish to go in the other direction, and give your second sentence the same sense as your first (that the enjoyment may still be continuing, you must switch the second sentence to present continuous:

"Until today, I am enjoying school in spite of the work." It would be like saying, "So far, so good!"

- A.
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Hi Avangi,
These two sentences are in the novel "The one billion dollar girl". They are not mine:

Until today, I was enjoying school in spite of the work"
Until now, everything was going so well.

I find this use of tense her very strange. So I wonder whther it is correctly used or not.

By the way,I often see Present perfect used with Until now:

Until now, I have always lived here alone.(Now at this moment I still live alone)
Hi Tuongvan,
TuongvanUntil today, I was enjoying school in spite of the work"
Until now, everything was going so well.

I find this use of tense her very strange. So I wonder whther it is correctly used or not.
Those two sentences are okay. The continuous is used to express the duration. She had been enjoying school for a while, things had been going well for a long period of time. I would probably still shift it back myself: I HAD BEEN enjoying school (despite the work) until (whatever events happened earlier) today.

TuongvanBy the way,I often see Present perfect used with Until now:

Until now, I have always lived here alone.(Now at this moment I still live alone)
Were these sentences written by native speakers? Until now shows that something has changed from the way it had been in the past.

I have always lived here alone -- This would indicate that you still live here and you live here alone.

Until today, I HAD always lived here alone -- Something changed earlier today to change this. You got a roommate, or moved out of the place entirely.
TuongvanUntil now, I have always lived here alone.(Now at this moment I still live alone)
In this sentence "until now" is redundant and adds confussion. It points to a change.
TuongvanI find this use of tense her very strange. So I wonder whther it is correctly used or not.
In English we often use the simple past as a substitute for the past perfect.
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Let's face it: "today" is present tense. There's not a heckovalotof difference between "today" and "now." If a condition has existed until this very moment, the chances are pretty good it will make it into the next moment. Of course in a narrative, it's a teaser. We assume there's a punch line coming. Where's the rest of the story??

Semantically, there's no difference between "until now, everything is going well;" and "until now, everything was going well." This particular moment may be a very critical turning point - a pivotal moment - a decisive moment. Things may continue along status quo, or we may make a radical change - take a new direction.

The only thing I'm prepared to say is that the use of past tense here carries a stronger connotation that something may be afoot.

If you want to say, "Until earlier today, everything was going so well," then we have a different ballgame. You can't say, "Until earlier today everything is going so well," unless you happen to be using a special present-tense narrative style.

Until five minutes ago, when I last checked it, the generator was running perfectly. My use of past tense is not equivalent to saying the generator stopped running five minutes ago.

Edit. GG, I wrote this before I read your post. I'm not trying to be obstreperous (even though that's my nature).
Yes, Grammar Geek,

The sentence" I have always lived here alone" is taken from the Advanced Oxford Dictionary
TuongvanYes, Grammar Geek,

The sentence" I have always lived here alone" is taken from the Advanced Oxford Dictionary

I didn't question the part about "I have always lived here alone." To the contrary, I showed how it's used.

I questioned pairing it with "Until now."
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