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Hi,

I came upon a sentence with this phrase and have been wondering why the writer didn't place any articles in front of the ones italicized when the dictionary said they are countables. I thought countables must have articles regardless of the grammatical situations they are in. Was the writer able to get away with not following the rule because the effciency of the message took precedence over the grammar rules?

Anyone regardless of race, nationaliy, church, creed or rank is welcome.

Also, when do we use "is welcome" and "is welcomed"? Are they the same?
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Comments  
The absent of article somehow sounds right but I can't explain why.

However, I think welcome is used as a passive verb here and therefore "is welcomed" is more suitable.

Perhaps someone would want to shed some light on this.
Hello,

I'll give a shot.

The high-lighted statement is not talking about a specific religion or race but a general statement. When we speak of nouns in general, “the” is typically omitted.

Ex: “No T-shirts, sandals and shorts allowed” - general, no "the"

“We need more policemen and firemen for our community” – general

The policeman was chasing the robber – specific. Now "the is needed" because now we refer to the police as the one chasing the robber.

Welcome – both present and past participle use the same form

Goodman
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The adjective welcome (no 'd') means cordially invited (with 'd')! Strange, but true.

Anyone regardless of ... is welcome. = Anyone regardless of ... is cordially invited.

The verb form welcomed (with 'd') means cordially greeted (when they arrive).

Before the party:
You are welcome to come to the party.

After the party, telling about the party:
When we arrived at the party we were welcomed by the host.

____________

Abstract nouns are normally used without articles.

Traitors are not known for loyalty.

CJ
Thank you.

My dictionary did not say anything but the words "creed" and ""church" being countable nouns.

Let me get it straight, pardon me, are you saying that all uncountable nouns are not subject to the "the" rule if they are used in general ways? I am just curious.
AnonymousHi,

I came upon a sentence with this phrase and have been wondering why the writer didn't place any articles in front of the ones italicized when the dictionary said they are countables. I thought countables must have articles regardless of the grammatical situations they are in. Was the writer able to get away with not following the rule because the effciency of the message took precedence over the grammar rules?

Anyone regardless of race, nationaliy, church, creed or rank is welcome.

Also, when do we use "is welcome" and "is welcomed"? Are they the same?

It is omitting "their/his/her", so no article needed.

Anyone regardless of their/his/her race, nationality, church, creed or rank is welcome.
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Thank you.

In your opinion, is it a norm for a writer to omit "their/his/her" and readers will accept those instances with open arms?
How about this?

Your comments will be welcomed.
How about this?

It's a nice sentence. It's more common to welcome people than to welcome comments, but you can welcome comments, yes! There shouldn't be any problem with that.

CJ
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