+0
Hi. I believe I have asked a question similar to this in the past and believe I haven't gotten a clear answer. That is why I am asking this again using the sentence which I think I have used back then (maybe changed the sentence a little).

Why would you (if you do) an indefinite article here in both places?

To proceed this process further, you need to submit an Application for Tax Exemption along with a Residence Certificate.

You have two names that are capitalized and I think they indicate they contain/mark some internal importance (to a company). Does that mean it is a proper noun (name?) in that no other like that is out there (any where?)? If it is not, then could we say that names for these types of documents that are capitalized are not proper nouns (names?) and need not only use definite articles in front of them?
Comments  
.
They are the names of the form and the certificate respectively. You need to submit one of each. 'A' = one. They are not proper nouns in this usage.
.
Thank you so much. Can you give me an instance where either of them could be considered a proper noun instead of being the names of the form and certificate as they were?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
.
I take my comment back; they are always proper nouns, but proper nouns can take the indefinite article, particularly when there are several of them. Here's an on-line example:

Tina offered Antonio one of her mother's homemade oatmeal cookies but only an Oreo would satisfy his sweet tooth.

The common-noun form in your case would simply be an application for tax exemption and a residence certificate.
.
Thank you again.

You wrote/provided this sentence which you said that you got it from online:

Tina offered Antonio one of her mother's homemade oatmeal cookies but only an Oreo would satisfy his sweet tooth.

Here, would you say "an Oreo" is a box/bag (whatever it comes in) of Oreo cookies or a single Oreo cookie -- or it doesn't matter in practical situations?
.
He wouldn't eat the bag. It is a single cookie.
.
Try out our live chat room.
Thank you once more. I think we can say this to a store clerk:

Can I have an Oreo?

And in this case, we would mean a box or bag the product comes in with however many Oreo cookies in it.
.
That would be your intention, but the clerk would find it odd, I think. He would expect 'Can I have a bag of Oreos?' or 'Can I have some Oreos?' Of course, we do not normally ask the clerk at all-- we take the package off the shelf ourselves.
.