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Hi guys!

Here's a sentence:

If you will meet all advanced degree requirements (even though you have not necessarily graduated), including the completion or successful defense of any required thesis or dissertation, you may be eligible to apply.

Why is "will" used after "if" here?

Thanks!

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Aqua2020Why is "will" used after "if" here?

It looks like a mistake by a non-native speaker, but I would have to see the whole piece to be sure. "Will" is indeed possible in such a setting, but the meaning is unlikely, and it seems way off here. "If you will meet (requirements)" would mean "if at the future time when you wish to apply, you take the trouble to meet (requirements)". But for a native reader like me, the immediate impression is that the writer is not fluent and supposes that you need a future tense, and I have to go back and think a second to get any other interpretation.

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Aqua2020Why is "will" used after "if" here?

It seems that it's just a mistake. There is no good reason for using 'will' there.

CJ