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I'm not checking all these for etymology so some may be wrong: devise and bequeath nook and cranny hue and cry goods and chattels null and void needles and pins-a cease and desist

Pray and beseech. There are quite a few in the Book of Common Prayer.

Katy
goods and chattels cease and desist

Thanks! That's just the kind of list I was hoping for. I contest the inclusion of "needles and pins-a" (even though I appreciate the musical reference), since needles and pins are two different things.

So are goods and chattels, I believe.
Katy
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Thanks! That's just the kind of list I was hoping ... musical reference), since needles and pins are two different things.

So are goods and chattels, I believe.

I don't think there's much of a distinction between the two in AmE, other than the general archaicness of 'chattel'. They both refer broadly to similar subsets of property (tangible, movable sorts of things). 'Chattel' is also more of a strictly legal sort of term, while 'good' is also used in, for example, economics (and I'm not sure how broad the usage is there, if there's even a standard definition).
I know (or believe I know) that "will and testament" is an example of Saxon and Norman equivalent terms that were joined for the sake of better understanding. Is there a term for this type of joining of synonyms into a phrase?

The closest I've been able to find, "parelcon", sounds good from the definition, but I haven't found any examples of it of the "will and testament" sort.
From Silva Rhetoricae
http://humanities.byu.edu/rhetoric/Figures/P/parelcon.htm

parelcon
The use of redundant or superfluous terms. Often
the use of two words in lieu of one.
The pronunciation is "parELcon".
So are goods and chattels, I believe.

I don't think there's much of a distinction between the two in AmE, other than the general archaicness of 'chattel'. ... in, for example, economics (and I'm not sure how broad the usage is there, if there's even a standard definition).

Aren't goods primarily intended to be sold, hired, rented, let, exchanged, bartered, pledged, offered as colleteral or otherwise transferred between persons, while chattels are tangible fixed assets pertaining to the property owned by a person, M'Lud?

Ross Howard
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I don't think there's much of a distinction between the two in AmE, other than the general archaicness of 'chattel'. ... in, for example, economics (and I'm not sure how broad the usage is there, if there's even a standard definition).

I see a distinction between "chattel slavery" and "good slavery".

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
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I'm not checking all these for etymology so some may ... chattels null and void needles and pins-a cease and desist

Quite often, IIRC, these things weren't originally synonyms, but have become so as their paired form became a set phrase. ... property (or possibly vice versa). Similarly, I have read that "cease" means "stop", but "desist" means "and don't start again".

Nevertheless, I think this repetition of like or at least similar ideas, particularly when they are alliterative, goes back to Anglo-Saxon, Germanic poetry, ie it is poetic convention of long-standing, which has been retained in speech, eg house and home, cf German Haus und Hof (where the words do not mean exactly the same, but the phrase does).

Rob Bannister
"Cease" and "desist" are both via Fr/Lat, I think (at least they're cesar* and *desistir in Spanish). How about "aiding and abetting"

Both via Old French. Also, like "cease and desist", not quite the same thing. "Aiding" is helping, "abetting" was "to urge on", later, "to support, countenance; encourage, instigate". One could do either without doing the other. Presumably the conjunction was meant to imply that it wasn't a crime to help against your will, and it wasn't a crime to agree or encourage as long as you didn't actually help.

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I know (or believe I know) that "will and testament" is an example of Saxon and Norman equivalent terms that ... there a term for this type of joining of synonyms into a phrase? Also, what are other (especially Saxon/Norman) examples?

Gowers (in MEU2) calls then "Siamese twins". He has some very nice examples.
David
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