I know (or believe I know) that "will and testament" is an example of Saxon and Norman equivalent terms that were joined for the sake of better understanding.
Is there a term for this type of joining of synonyms into a phrase? Also, what are other (especially Saxon/Norman) examples?

Thanks!
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I know (or believe I know) that "will and testament" is an example of Saxon and Norman equivalent terms that ... there a term for this type of joining of synonyms into a phrase? Also, what are other (especially Saxon/Norman) examples?

I'm not checking all these for etymology so some may be wrong:

devise and bequeath
nook and cranny
hue and cry
goods and chattels
null and void
needles and pins-a
cease and desist

John Dean
Oxford
I know (or believe I know) that "will and testament" ... into a phrase? Also, what are other (especially Saxon/Norman) examples?

I'm not checking all these for etymology so some may be wrong: devise and bequeath nook and cranny hue and cry goods and chattels null and void needles and pins-a cease and desist

"Cease" and "desist" are both via Fr/Lat, I think (at least they're cesar* and *desistir in Spanish).
How about "aiding and abetting" or a non-legalese one "fresh fields and pastures new"?

Ross Howard
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I know (or believe I know) that "will and testament" is an example ofSaxon and Norman equivalent terms that were ... there a term for this type of joining of synonyms into a phrase? Also, what are other (especially Saxon/Norman) examples?

Two common sources are legal English (e.g. "I give and bequeathe," "heirs and assigns," etc.) and the 16th century Book of Common Prayer. (An old parson I knew said writing new prayers was easy. All you had to do was double everything e.g. thank God for his gifts and grace, petition for forgiveness of sins and trespasses, hope that diviine grace would abide and abound iin us, and so on.)

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
@news6.svr.pol.co.uk:
I know (or believe I know) that "will and testament" ... into a phrase? Also, what are other (especially Saxon/Norman) examples?

I'm not checking all these for etymology so some may be wrong: devise and bequeath nook and cranny hue and cry goods and chattels null and void needles and pins-a cease and desist

Thanks! That's just the kind of list I was hoping for. I contest the inclusion of "needles and pins-a" (even though I appreciate the musical reference), since needles and pins are two different things.

I'm still wondering if there is a term for this type of thing; there's a term for every other language construct, so why not?
Thanks! That's just the kind of list I was hoping for. I contest the inclusion of "needles and pins-a" (even though I appreciate the musical reference), since needles and pins are two different things.

Needles and pins are not always different things. For instance, knitting needles (which in some dialects were called "knitting pins") are of the same form as pins.
Fran
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I know (or believe I know) that "will and testament" ... into a phrase? Also, what are other (especially Saxon/Norman) examples?

I'm not checking all these for etymology so some may be wrong: devise and bequeath nook and cranny hue and cry goods and chattels null and void needles and pins-a cease and desist

Quite often, IIRC, these things weren't originally synonyms, but have become so as their paired form became a set phrase. I read somewhere that a "will" originally dealt with real estate, while a "testament" dealt with personal property (or possibly vice versa). Similarly, I have read that "cease" means "stop", but "desist" means "and don't start again".

Aaron Davies
Opinions expressed are solely those of a random number generator. "I don't know if it's real or not but it is a myth." -Jami JoAnne of alt.folklore.urban, showing her grasp on reality.
I know (or believe I know) that "will and testament" is an example of Saxon and Norman equivalent terms that ... there a term for this type of joining of synonyms into a phrase? Also, what are other (especially Saxon/Norman) examples?

I don't know about etymology, but I believe wills were used for immovable (real) property, which was devised, and testaments for immovable (personal) property, which was bequeathed.
Legal fundis may correct me.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
@news6.svr.pol.co.uk:

I'm not checking all these for etymology so some may ... chattels null and void needles and pins-a cease and desist

Thanks! That's just the kind of list I was hoping for. I contest the inclusion of "needles and pins-a" (even ... there is a term for this type of thing; there's a term for every other language construct, so why not?

Redundancy?
As in RAID = Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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