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By the time you get back, I will finish/have finished the work.

By the time you get back, we will be/have been married for 25 years.

Which of the underlined words will you use in the above two samples respectively? Thanks.
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Comments  
You want to talk about something that will have been completed, but in the future.

I will finish this tomorrow is okay. But you want to talk about the state of it already being finished by the time some other event passes, so something that indicates the past is required.

I will finish the work about the same time you get back - simultaneous events.

I will have finished the work by the time you get back - I am finished before you are back.
Thanks, GG, for the reply.

But what about the second one?
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AngliholicThanks, GG, for the reply.

But what about the second one?
Same thinking, just passive.
Marius Hancu
AngliholicThanks, GG, for the reply.

But what about the second one?

Same thinking, just passive.
Thanks, Marius.

Are you sure it's passive and the same answer?
Marius Hancu
AngliholicThanks, GG, for the reply.

But what about the second one?

Same thinking, just passive.
Thanks, Marius.

Are you sure it's passive and the same answer?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
The grammatical formula is

By the time [present], ... will have [past participle] ....

Of course, if the past participle is been, it's likely you're dealing with a passive, but that makes no difference.

CJ
Thanks, Jim.

I get it now.
By the time you get back I'll have finished of course.Why?Cause I'm suggesting that at a certain time in the future when she/he comes back I'll already have ended somethinh which started maybe before they went away or at the time they went away but will end the time they they get back.(Will,future pred) (have finished present perfect that indicates recent finished action in the past before they'll come back)
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