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Hello teachers.

I've Ran through this problem this here and needed your help.

Could you please explain me the rationale behind the sentence

"You will have had to see it"

Is it equal to the sentence "by the time I arrive you will have already had dinner" ?


2) could you explain me the rationale behind the sentence

"You will have had to have seen it" as well?


3) are the following sentences grammatically correct?

"I would have had to have been around 6-7 years for this to have happend"

I would have had to been around 12 years old"

Why is the usage of "been" and not "be" in Here?

Thank you very much.

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anonymous"You will have had to see it"

More context please. It is not a usual sentence, and it is not straightforward to understand why it might be used.

anonymous"You will have had to have seen it" as well?

It may be a more complicated way of saying the same thing. Again, more context is needed.

anonymous"I would have had to have been around 6-7 years for this to have happened"

Largely it is grammatical, but "have had" is not really necessary here. You can just say "have". Say "around 6-7 years old" or just "around 6 or 7", not "around 6-7 years". "... for this to have happened" is a slightly unexpected continuation; the meaning seems a bit unusual, though not impossible.

anonymousI would have had to been around 12 years old"
Why is the usage of "been" and not "be" in Here?

That sentence is ungrammatical. It is presumably a typo or mix-up between "to be around" and "to have been around".

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anonymous"You will have had to see it"
Is it equal to the sentence "by the time I arrive you will have already had dinner" ?

Equal? No, it can't be. There's nothing about dinner in the first sentence.

anonymousCould you please explain me the rationale behind the sentence "You will have had to see it"

I don't know what you mean by "rationale". I can only tell you what it means to me.

You almost certainly have seen it. / You cannot have failed to see it.

anonymousYou will have had to have seen it

This has the same meaning as the example above but with more words. The perfect infinitive is not really necessary, though some would argue that it looks at the "seeing it" from a temporal viewpoint just after the "seeing it" happened. This is not a significant difference from the viewpoint of the first example, which is at the same time that the "seeing it" happened.

anonymousI would have had to have been around 6-7 years for this to have happened

The meaning is unclear.

I would have had to have been around six or seven years old when this happened.

Just as good if not better:

I would have had to be around six or seven years old when this happened.

anonymousI would have had to been around 12 years old."
Why is the usage of "been" and not "be" in here?

Somebody made a mistake. Most likely, they left out 'have': ... to have been around ...

If you heard this (rather than read it), to have may have been contracted to the sound "toove", and the final "v" sound may have gone missing if the speaker was speaking quickly.

CJ

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  

OK, thank you for answers.

When I say what is the "rationale", I mean it as "are these sentences grammatically- wise?"

For example,

1)"You will have had to see it by the time I come home"

so, can i say this is correct ? I want to say that he will have watched the movie by the time I'm home.

2) "you will have had to have seen it by 6 o'clock".

how does this differ from:

"you will have had to see it by 6 o'clock"

My senses tell me that it has the same meaning?


3) as for the sentence

"I would have had to been around 12 years old"

The original sentence is:

I mean, we couldn't have been together for 11 years, because then I would have had to been 12"

So that means the correct answer is "I would've had to have been 12"?

Thank you.

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anonymous1)"You will have had to see it by the time I come home"

That's correct but awkward.

anonymous2) "you will have had to have seen it by 6 o'clock". how does this differ from: "you will have had to see it by 6 o'clock"My senses tell me that it has the same meaning?

Yes, it has the same meaning. The shorter version is a little less awkward.

anonymous3) ... that means the correct answer is "I would've had to have been 12"?

Correct.

CJ

Thank you cj, always of support.