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Dear sir,

Why "will more" is used in the sentences below instead of "will be more"?
Is "will more" a dialect spoken locally in America?
Do they make any difference in meaning?
Will the meanings remain unchanged If I replace "will more" with "will be more" in the below sentences?

A). Internet advertising in the US will more than double to US$50.3 billion in 2011 from $21.7 billion last year, driven by technology investments, according to a study by research firm Yankee Group.

B).Trends further ahead are typically harder to predict. Still, the Pew Center projects that in 2050, 19 percent of Americans will be foreign-born; that the share of Hispanic residents will more than double to 29 percent from 14 percent in 2005; and that the proportion of Asians will almost double, from 5 percent to 9 percent.

Your advice will be very much appreciated!
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Dear CalifJim,
Great explanation!
I now totally understand the meaning and the usage of it.
Your illustrative examples work on me immediately. It's a magic!
You're one of the best in this forum!

Thank you very much,

Best Regards,
Nokia88
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Comments  
Both are will "more than double" = the sum/figure will increase to more than twice its present level
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Hi Nokia88

You cannot simply replace 'will more than double' with 'will be more than double' in your sentences. The verb 'be' doesn't work with the words 'to' and 'from' in those sentences.
In both cases "double" is a verb, so "will more than double" is correct and "will be more than double" is wrong.

In sentences where "double" is a noun, "will be more than double" is correct. For example: If we go back next week then the prices will be more than double what they are today.

You can also make a passive construction, but then you need "doubled": Turnover will be more than doubled, to $50 billion (though this sentence is slightly ugly IMO; normally I would just say Turnover will double...).
Feebs11Both are will "more than double" = the sum/figure will increase to more than twice its present level

Thank you
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YankeeHi Nokia88

You cannot simply replace 'will more than double' with 'will be more than double' in your sentences. The verb 'be' doesn't work with the words 'to' and 'from' in those sentences.

Dear Yankee,
I thought this is a very simple phrase that I could understand without having to ask around. But I was wrong!
Not till you explained it to me did I realize it was actually so difficult and complicated.

Thank you so much!
Mr WordyIn both cases "double" is a verb, so "will more than double" is correct and "will be more than double" is wrong.

In sentences where "double" is a noun, "will be more than double" is correct. For example: If we go back next week then the prices will be more than double what they are today.

You can also make a passive construction, but then you need "doubled": Turnover will be more than doubled, to $50 billion (though this sentence is slightly ugly IMO; normally I would just say Turnover will double...).

Dear Mr Wordy,
Thank you so much for the clear explanation and easy-to-understand examples.
Thank you one more time!
Sir, what is your advice in this paragraph?
(link) http://en.ce.cn/Industries/Consumen-Industries/200806/05/t20080605_15736942.shtml

The number of casinos in Macau has more than doubled to 29 since the government ended billionaire Stanley Ho's 40-year gaming monopoly in 2002 and awarded licenses to five other operators. Annual expansion of 29 percent will more than double revenue in three years while sustained 45 percent growth will achieve the same effect in a two-year period.

A). Is "double" a noun or a verb in the phrase?
B). Can "will more than double" be replaced by "will be more than double" in the phrase as it's not followed by "to"?
C). Has the writer dropped the "be" inhabitually?
D). Or, shall I consider both cases are grammatically correct?

Thanks in advance!
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
A). Is "double" a noun or a verb in the phrase? verb
B). Can "will more than double" be replaced by "will be more than double" in the phrase as it's not followed by "to"? No.

C). Has the writer dropped the "be" inhabitually? The writer is correct. Nothing unusual here.

D). Or, shall I consider both cases are grammatically correct? No.
to is not necessary. double is still a verb even without to.
Revenue = $100,000
If something doubles revenue, it makes revenue = $200,000.
If something triples revenue, it makes revenue = $300,000.
If something more than doubles revenue, it makes revenue > $200,000.
If something more than triples revenue, it makes revenue > $300,000.
But something can double revenue to $200,000.
And something can more than double revenue to $285,000.
Something may not quite double revenue to $195,000.
In addition to doubling revenue, factors may double prices, may double costs, may double payments, may double growth, etc.
CJ
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