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Hi. I want to ask you because I have trouble with a page that I´ve read about talking about the future.

They say:
We can use will and shall to talk about things we are sure will happen, eg. Exports will continue to rise over the next few months. Adding really, most certainly we emphasise our certainty. But they also say that we can express doubt by adding presumably, probably:eg, You probably won´t like their new single.

They say that using may, might and could we are talking about things that are possible to happen and would to those that are very unlikely to happen. But in other paragrpah, they say :
However, we can use will if other words in the sentence show that something is unlikely, eg, I doubt if we´ll ever again experience a winter quite cold as this one. The situation, stress and intonation, and other words we use in the statements can affect the degree of probability more than the modal itself.

I´m rather confused about this so I´d like to ask about the right and common usage of "will" as a modal and some examples to understand it-

Thanks a lot- Yours truly.
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insidelightthe right and common usage of "will" as a modal and some examples to understand it-
That's exactly what your book is telling you. It is telling you the correct and common usage of "will" (as a modal). All the examples given in your book are correct.

They say "We can ...", "We can ...", "We can ...", thereby showing you various usages of "will". You can use "will" in all the ways shown there. One of the things that your book seems to stress is that other words used with "will" can affect the meaning of "will". Maybe that is what is confusing you.

CJ
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insidelightYou won´t probably won't like their new single
That sentence means that the speaker is relatively sure about the other person's (future) dislike of the single.
insidelightWouldn´t it be?: You mightn´t might not like their new single
In this sentence, I'd say the speaker is less sure about the other person's (future) dislike of the single. The speaker views "not like their single" as a possibility, but doesn't feel very sure about it.
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Comments  
THANKS! iT´S OK. But if they say that we use may, might for those things that are possible to happen and will for the things that we are sure to happen, in this example that they give:

You won´t probably like their new single

Wouldn´t it be?: You mightn´t like their new single
Excuse me, but I cannot see it clear, as clear as you do.

Thanks
 Yankee's reply was promoted to an answer.
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insidelight... if they say that we use may, might for those things that are possible to happen and will for the things that we are sure to happen, in this example that they give:
You won´t probably like their new single

Wouldn´t it be?: You mightn´t like their new single.

The book is telling you this:

You won't like their new single means You [definitely / certainly] will not like their new single. (This is sure to happen.)

But now add probably:

You probably won't like their new single means It is probable that you will not like their new single. (This is almost sure to happen, but maybe it will not happen.)

So you see, the addition of probably changes the meaning a little.
___________

The book is saying that this change makes the statement similar (but not identical) to the statement with might or may:

You [might /may] not like their new single means It is possible that you will not like their new single. (This can happen or not happen. Either outcome is possible.)
___________

So probably will is similar, but not exactly the same as might or may.

CJ
Oh, yes, I can see it now. By adding the adverb the usage of will is similar, but not exactly the same, as may or might.
I´m very thanked for all the answers. I´m learning!

Keep in touch! tHANKS.[Y]