+0
Hi,

often text books say that if you make a prediction, it doesn´t make any difference in meaning whether you use "will" or "going to". Let´s have a look at the following sentences:

(1) Ann is going to get married next monday.

(2) Ann will get married next monday.

Assume that both are used to make a prediction on, let´s say, wednesday. What if as matter of fact the wedding, very surprisingly, doesn´t take place? Does it follow that (2) is false, while (1) is true? If this indeed follows, there is a difference in meaning.

But keep in mind that (1) is used as prediction. Maybe this is a completely different use than using (1) to express that Ann is planning to get married. In this usage (1) would of course be true, even if there is in fact no wedding. But what if (1) is used to make prediction?
Comments  
Type "will going to" (no quotes) in the search box at the top of your page, and you will find several discussions.

Welcome to the Forums!
Welcome to the Forums!

Statements about the future have no true-false value in the sense you are talking about. Either the future event comes about or it doesn't. That doesn't mean it wasn't intended or planned, which is all that such statements are claiming.
Take the word 'prediction' very loosely. Textbooks do not usually get into the detailed, hair-splitting analysis that you are looking for here! It would increase the length of such a book by tenfold!
It's hard to see 'going to' as a real prediction. It's more of a statement about a known schedule of planned events.

See Will/be going to.
See Will.

CJ
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Take a look at these two examples:

#1

There is no milk in the fridge. I will go and buy some.
(You hadn't planned to go and buy milk, but when you realized that there isn't any milk in the fridge, you decided to buy some.)

# 2

I'm going to go out with my friends tomorrow evening.
(That's what you're planning to do.)

Hope you can understand the difference.
LoojkaTake a look at these two examples:

#1
There is no milk in the fridge. I will go and buy some.
(You hadn't planned to go and buy milk, but when you realized that there isn't any milk in the fridge, you decided to buy some.)

# 2
I'm going to go out with my friends tomorrow evening.
(That's what you're planning to do.)

Hope you can understand the difference.
Now, wait a minute!
Couldn't it be possible to say something like this: [:^)]

"There's no beer in the fridge, so I'm going to go out with my friends in the evening and try to find myself a pint of good ol' Irish ale!"

I must confess that this "will vs. going to" thing is still confusing me a lot! I would really appreciate a more detailed explanation, preferably with lots of examples!
Couldn't it be possible to say something like this:
"There's no beer in the fridge, so I'm going to go out with my friends in the evening and try to find myself a pint of good ol' Irish ale!"
__________

Yes. It's quite possible to say that. You formulate a plan to do something once you realize that there's no beer in the fridge. But Loojka's remarks (which summarize the main differences very neatly) don't claim that you can't say that, if that's what you were thinking!

Did you trace through the links I gave above? There's a lot more about the differences there.

CJ
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
SimpleHeartedNow, wait a minute!
Couldn't it be possible to say something like this: [:^)]

"There's no beer in the fridge, so I'm going to go out with my friends in the evening and try to find myself a pint of good ol' Irish ale!"

Of course it's possible Emotion: smile You're saying that you'replanning to go out with your friends this evening (that's why you used "going to" form), whereas "I will go and buy some" indicates that you made the decision once you realized that there's no milk and you will go and buy it now.

"Going to" can be compared to the present continuous. Take a look at this:

There's no beer in the fridge, so I'm going to go out with my friends in the evening and try to find myself a pint of good ol' Irish ale! ("going to")
or:
There's no beer in the fridge, so I'm going out with my friends in the evening ... (present continuous)
(both imply planned action)

Another example:
Loojka: I'm thinking about visiting Belgrade these days...
SimpleHearted: Great! I 'll take a day off. Maybe we can go out for a drink.
(You made the decision when I told you I was coming. Now you can tell your friends: "I can't go out with you on Saturday because Loojka is coming and I'm going to go out with her.")
Emotion: smile

I hope that this helps Emotion: smile
LoojkaAnother example:
Loojka: I'm thinking about visiting Belgrade these days...
SimpleHearted: Great! I 'll take a day off. Maybe we can go out for a drink.
(You made the decision when I told you I was coming. Now you can tell your friends: "I can't go out with you on Saturday because Loojka is coming and I'm going to go out with her.")
Emotion: smile
I hope that this helps Emotion: smile
Great!!! Everything is clear to me now, at least as far as "will vs. going to" is concerned (and I hope Terence78 feels the same).

Thank you, loojka, both for this excellent explanation and for accepting my humble invitation to explore esoteric Belgrade restaurants and cafes with me! [L]
Extremely looking forward to seeing you soon!
It's not a prediction. It's a future plan. Thus will is wrong and going to is correct.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.