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What is the difference between "I'll do it." and "I would do it."?
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I will do it = future. It's a sure thing.

I would do it = conditional. Something has to happen in order for you to do it.

I would do it if you paid me enough. I would do it if I had the time.
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If you say you'll do it, you have promised to do it or stated your firm intention to do it.
If you say you would do it, you have some conditions in mind. You would do it if these conditions applied, but not otherwise.

will is relatively non-contingent; would is contingent upon other factors.

I'll help you pack when you're ready to go. (I'll help. I promise to help. I have the firm intention of helping. No particular preconditions need to be fulfilled.)

I would help you pack if you paid me $100. (I don't help except when the condition of payment is met. No true promise is made.)

CJ
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Comments  
CalifJimI would help you pack if you paid me $100. (I don't help except when the condition of payment is met. No true promise is made.)

"If you are good today, I will let you watch TV tonight."

This is a FIRST CONDITIONAL. However, the boy cannot watch TV tonight unless he is good today (unless the condition is met). Can you explain to me the use of 'will' in this sentence where it is not a promise?

I think, "If you are good today, I would let you watch TV tonight" definitely sounds incorrect in comparision to the above FIRST CONDITIONAL where we use 'will'.

Also, "If you are good today, you can watch TV tonight."

OR "If you are good today, you could watch TV tonight."
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Anonymous"If you are good today, I will let you watch TV tonight."
I would call this a promise even though it's conditional on being good.
AnonymousI think, "If you are good today, I would let you watch TV tonight" definitely sounds incorrect in comparision to the above FIRST CONDITIONAL where we use 'will'.
So do I.
Anonymous"If you are good today, you can watch TV tonight."
I take this as a promise too.
Anonymous"If you are good today, you could watch TV tonight."
This sounds a bit anomalous to me. It's definitely not a promise. I take the inclusion of "could" as a "maybe", so it can't be a true promise.

CJ
"He'd look to the door seeing someone step in "not...invited" would be his words to the man, shooting him a look.

All other problems aside, is this correct usage of the word 'would'?

We will be glad to assist you in any way we can that is within our guidelines. or

We would be glad to assist you in any way we can that is within our guidelines

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First, what do you think, please?