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1. What is the difference between 'will' and 'would' below?

A. Will the rate increase?
B. Would the rate increase?

2. If I use 'will' in the first sentence of C, can I use 'would' in the next sentence? Likewise, in D, if I use 'would' in the first sentence, can I use will in the next sentence? Is it gramatically required to be consistent throughout one's sentences?

C. Will the rate increase? We would be happy if the rate remained.

D. Would the rate increase? We will be happy if the rate remains.
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You can research about this problem here: www.differencebetween.net/language/difference-between-would-and-will/
Sincerely,
Thanks, gigilian, for the link. It was really helpful.

However, in my particular example, what is the difference between 'will' and 'would'? With 'will', is it definite that I am getting a 'yes' answer, whereas with 'would', the answer can either be yes or no?

Could you please answer #2 as well?

I was wondering if a native speaker could also share their thoughts on this. Thank you.
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B and D cannot stand alone; an 'if' clause is needed if 'would' is to be used.
We can't just assume there is an implied conditional, MM?
Anonymous2. If I use 'will' in the first sentence of C, can I use 'would' in the next sentence? Likewise, in D, if I use 'would' in the first sentence, can I use will in the next sentence? Is it gramatically required to be consistent throughout one's sentences?
There's no such rule that I know of.

Sometimes a particular sequence of tenses involving a particular set of verbs and adverbs will produce an illogical outcome, but the lexical meanings of the words is as much involved as the tenses.

Are you talking about a single conditional situation??

If I lost my job, would the interest rate on my loan go up? Will I still be able to go to college?

Are you asking if something like this would work?
I suppose if two different sentences both relate back to the same "condition," you should not switch from "would" to "will."
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Switching the tense of the example, we see the same problem:

If I lose my job, will the interest rate on my loan go up? Would I still be able to go to college?

Similarly, I don't think you should switch from "will" to "would."

But you may immediately follow that with a new conditional of a different sort.
We can't just assume there is an implied conditional, MM?-- We cannot assume anything when we don't know what the poster knows or doesn't know. In this case, it is not certain that the original poster even knows the phrase 'implied conditional', so that had better be discussed in another thread.
About this one,i really don't know a lot.But my teacher told me that,it's up to the case,the Present or Past.I can give you some examples:

1) If i were you,i would visit grandma.

If i knew about it sooner,i would help her.

2) I will wait here until you come.

If i see her,i will tell her about this problem.

^_^
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