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1. Will you be coming to the concert tonight?

2. Are you coming to the concert tonight?

What's the difference in meaning or style between the above sentences?
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Comments  
I think in the first, the speaker simply asks whether the other person will be there at the concert, whether he'll see him/her.

In the second one, the speaker asks whether the other person has made arrangements to be at the concert.
first one, future continues tense. and it means you are in future and action continues in future.

but second one, continues tense but you wrote there tonight and it was future tense. so both are correct.

second one likes will you come to the concert tonight?
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Teo1. Will you be coming to the concert tonight?

2. Are you coming to the concert tonight?

What's the difference in meaning or style between the above sentences?

I think “tonight” is the key word in this sentence. “Will you be” contains a remote sense of time which perhaps understood by most people; whereas “are you coming” implies a closer reference of time. In your sentences, both are fine as far a grammar is concerned. But if you really want to be technical about the difference, I would say: [are you coming] to the concert tonight” is more preferred ” than [will you be]. That’s just my opinion. I think using English as ESL learners, we often are confused with the time reference in which a sentence is formed. The ability to distinguish takes time to develop.
I'd answer #1 with 'Yes, I will", (or "No, I won't"), and #2 with "Yes, I am", (or "No, I'm not").
#1 seems to express more eagerness or interest, on the speaker's part.

If someone lithe and appealing said it to me, I would feel I had no option but to say yes.

MrP
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Hi Teo,

In my opinion the two sentences are too much alike to notice any difference.

Felipe
Hi MrP,

That's interesting. I tend to feel that 'Will you be coming . . .' suggests more emotional distance and detachment on the part of the speaker.

(eg Supercilious waiter to customer he wants to get rid of: Will you be wanting anything else, sir?)

Furthermore, 'Are you coming to the concert?' sounds to me like it could be an invitation that we should go to the concert together, whereas 'Will you be coming to the concert?' sounds a bit more like we may both go separately and I might just see you there.

Best wishes, Clive
Will you be wanting anything else, sir?

Can we say Are you wanting anything else, sir?
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