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Hi,
the topic is dot or point?

Windows 3.1
Firefox 2.0.0.9
SoftwareDunno ver. 2.2.1b

I heard that if there's only one dot, it's pronounced "point", otherwise it's "dot". So it should be "Windows 3 point one" but "Firefox 2 dot 0 dot 0 dot 9".

Opinions? Thanks Emotion: smile
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Hi,

I'd probably say 'point' in both cases. It seems to be the standard term when one is talking about 'versions'.

Clive
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Thanks.
Thak makes sense... I think I was wrong, and what I read was this:

Use 'point' when you're talking about a decimal point in a number, eg version 2.0 or 16.9 percent (but not when the number is a sum of money, and if the position of the decimal point is obvious from the context, eg if your cup of coffee costs $3.49, you'll be asked for 'three forty-nine'). As with the money exception, it is also accepted usage to say just 'two oh' if the context makes it evident that what you mean is '2.0';

Use 'dot' when you're talking about a separator, whether between letters or numbers, eg a web address like zdnet.com is said 'zdnet dot com', and similarly a numeric IP address like 192.168.1.1 is said '192 dot 168 dot 1 dot 1'. This rule also explains why the name of an IEEE standard like 802.11 (WiFi) is spoken with a dot rather than a point

~(Link: http://blogs.zdnet.com/SAAS/?p=290 )

Does that make sense for American English? Are there "dots" in IP addresses like 198.30.1.1?
Thanks Emotion: smile
Hi,

Yeah, that sounds OK.

As regards IP addresses like 198.30.1.1, I never have occasion to say them aloud, so it's not an issue for me. Emotion: smile

Clive
Ah, ok, thanks.
I'll say "dot" until someone tells me "what did you just say instead of point?" Emotion: smile
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