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Hi,

The weather is not very
(1) spring-like
(2) summer-like
(3) autumn-like /fall-like
(4) wintry or winter-like
today.

(a) Which of these example sentences are OK?
(b) Are "wintry" and "winter-like" interchangeable in all contexts?

Thanks!

mus-te
Comments  
The normal adjectives are

springlike (or spring-like)
summery
autumnal
wintry.

Additionally, the names of the seasons are used attributively (like adjectives) like this:

The spring flowers are a delight.
I wore a summer dress.
The fashion designer presented her autumn collection.
The winter blizzards caused a lot of damage.

The alternative forms can never be said to be interchangeable in all contexts.

Rover
Thank you Rover!
A couple more questions if I may...

(1) I hear that AmEng speakers use "fall" for "autumn". I wonder if "autumnal weather" would be common enough in AmEng too? (I realize that you are a BE speaker ... I am just trying to figure out which alternatives are common on either side of...)

(2) What differs say "summery" from "summer-like"? Is the latter ungrammatical? folksy? out of date?
Please give me some idea of what these differences "look like" (please!)

Emotion: shake hands
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I'm sure AE speakers use 'autumnal weather'.

Click here to read what the few dictionaries which include 'summerlike' have to say about it. It's a very unusual word; I recommend you don't bother using it.

Rover
"Autumn" is rarely used in AmE, so "fall" or "fall-like" weather would be more typical.
At least where I live (Southeast US) "wintry weather" usually refers to snow/ice/freezing temperatures. "Winter-like" usually refers to temperatures like those typical of winter if they occur during other seasons.
Rover_KEIt's a very unusual word; I recommend you don't bother using it.
I see.
Thanks again!
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Anonymous"wintry weather" usually refers to snow/ice/freezing temperatures. "Winter-like" usually refers to temperatures like those typical of winter if they occur during other seasons.
It is a very interesting distinction! Thanks for focusing on it, Anonymous!Emotion: yes
Subtle (?) distinction: a wintry smile is certainly possible but not a winter-like smile. A winter like day refers to a chill perhaps or winter weather conditions. Not a facial expression. English is so marvelously agile.
Adjective: Summery smile, dress, day, but summerlike is more apt as a comparison to other weather conditions. A summerlike day in November emphasizes the warm weather but a summery disposition etc., would stress the mildness or cheerfulness of the smiling expression on the face.
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