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Hi,

When you’re an organizor at an exhibition, you need to make sure that every stand has a basic electrical connection.

If I wanted to say that the electricians need to connect some cables to install the electrical connection, could I use the word ‘wire up’?

“The electricians need to wire up the plugs or cables?” “The electricians need to wire the cables to a power source.”

I’m not sure how to say it.

Thank you.

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You could use 'wire up', but the first sentence says it all : 'Every stand needs an electrical connection/a power point'.

Electricians don't need to be told that they must be wired up.

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I didn’t mean to include the first sentence. I just thought that it’d help you understand what I was trying to say.

I’m just curious about the use of ‘wire up’.

Are the sentences I suggested correct?:)

Thank you.

The phrase "wire up" is unusual and is typically heard only in the context of explosives.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

I don’t think that it’s unusual. I heard people use it and they were definitely not referring to explosives.

Could you just tell me if my sentences are correct?

“The electricians need to wire up the plugs or cables.”

“The electricians need to wire the cables up to a power source.”

I’m pretty sure that I could also use ‘wire up the stands’.

Thank you. I really appreciate your help. Emotion: smile

Ann225

I don’t think that it’s unusual. I heard people use it and they were definitely not referring to explosives.

Could you just tell me if my sentences are correct?

“The electricians need to wire up the plugs or cables.”

“The electricians need to wire the cables up to a power source.”

I’m pretty sure that I could also use ‘wire up the stands’.

Thank you. I really appreciate your help.

"Wire up" is an odd expression in that it necessarily involves real wires when you're talking about electricity. If the wires are already there, you can't use it. If the electricians wire up the booths, they actually run wires to them or within them, with the implication that they also terminate the wires properly for use.

“The electricians need to wire up the plugs or cables.” You can't wire up a cable because it is a wire. You wire up what the cable goes to. You can wire up the plugs.

“The electricians need to wire the cables up to a power source.” Ditto. You connect the cables to a power source.

I’m pretty sure that I could also use ‘wire up the stands’. Right.

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