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I have heard that Wish clauses can only work with the tenses below

Present and future:

-Simple past

-could V1

-would

Past:

-Past perfect

-could have done

Is it true or is there any other tense or sturucture???
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Comments  (Page 2) 
WesternAmericanIf you blindly trust that guy, why did you ask us that question?
Koh has given you a detailed explanation, but you choose to ignore it. Emotion: sad

No, I never ignored it; do not misunderstand. The guy that I trust is not an ordinary guy and also If I blindly trusted him, I would have never opened a thread here
Gencebay90
WesternAmericanIf you blindly trust that guy, why did you ask us that question?
Koh has given you a detailed explanation, but you choose to ignore it. Emotion: sad

No, I never ignored it; do not misunderstand. The guy that I trust is not an ordinary guy and also If I blindly trusted him, I would have never opened a thread here
Do you think our native speaker members are ordinary guys, and your friend is extraordinary? I've very high regard for the native speaker members of this Forum who sacrifice their time to help non-native speaker members like me.

If what I'd written is wrong, they would not have hesitated to correct me. Be assured.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Yoong Liat
Gencebay90
WesternAmerican
If you blindly trust that guy, why did you ask us that question?
Koh has given you a detailed explanation, but you choose to ignore it. Emotion: sad


No, I never ignored it; do not misunderstand. The guy that I trust is not an ordinary guy and also If I blindly trusted him, I would have never opened a thread here

Do you think our native speaker members are ordinary guys, and your friend is extraordinary? I've very high regard for the native speaker members of this Forum who sacrifice their time to help non-native speaker members like me.

If what I'd written is wrong, they would not have hesitated to correct me. Be assured.
I have never meant something like that and to me native speakers are always better than non-native speakers and I am expecting their responses

Emotion: smile
Gencebay90
Yoong Liat
Gencebay90
WesternAmericanIf you blindly trust that guy, why did you ask us that question?
Koh has given you a detailed explanation, but you choose to ignore it. Emotion: sad

No, I never ignored it; do not misunderstand. The guy that I trust is not an ordinary guy and also If I blindly trusted him, I would have never opened a thread here
Do you think our native speaker members are ordinary guys, and your friend is extraordinary? I've very high regard for the native speaker members of this Forum who sacrifice their time to help non-native speaker members like me.

If what I'd written is wrong, they would not have hesitated to correct me. Be assured.
I have never meant something like that and to me native speakers are always better than non-native speakers and I am expecting their responses

Emotion: smile
I believe our native speaker members are very alert and very fast in spotting errors. I think they should have pointed out my mistake long ago if there was one in relation to your topic.

Best wishes.
Hi Guys,

It’s raining buckets and you have a BBQ planned in your back yard. You’d say “I wish It weren’t raining…” This is subjunctive, not indicative; so “was” is incorrect although it’s frequently misused
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
thank you
GoodmanHi Guys,

It’s raining buckets and you have a BBQ planned in your back yard. You’d say “I wish It weren’t raining…” This is subjunctive, not indicative; so “was” is incorrect although it’s frequently misused
I wish it weren’t raining.
I wish it wasn’t raining.

Which English authority says that the second sentence is wrong?
Yoong Liat
Goodman
Hi Guys,

It’s raining buckets and you have a BBQ planned in your back yard. You’d say “I wish It weren’t raining…” This is subjunctive, not indicative; so “was” is incorrect although it’s frequently misused

I wish it weren’t raining.
I wish it wasn’t raining.

Which English authority says that the second sentence is wrong?

Liat, here is your answer:

English Grammar: Subjunctive (EnglishClub.com)

(The were form is correct at all times.) Informal ... I wish it were longer. I wish it was longer.

We usually use the subjunctive were instead of "was" after if (and other words with similar meaning). Look at these sentences:

  • If I were you, I would ask her.
  • Suppose she were here. What would you say?
  • Why do we say "I were", "he were"?

    We sometimes hear things like "if I were you, I would go" or "if he were here, he would tell you". Normally, the past tense of the verb "to be" is: I was, he was. But the if I were you structure does not use the past simple tense of the verb "to be". It uses the past subjunctive of the verb "to be". In the following examples, you can see that we often use the subjunctive form were instead of "was" after:

    • if
    • as if
    • wish
    • suppose


Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Goodman
Yoong Liat
GoodmanHi Guys,

It’s raining buckets and you have a BBQ planned in your back yard. You’d say “I wish It weren’t raining…” This is subjunctive, not indicative; so “was” is incorrect although it’s frequently misused
I wish it weren’t raining.
I wish it wasn’t raining.

Which English authority says that the second sentence is wrong?

Liat, here is your answer:

English Grammar: Subjunctive (EnglishClub.com)

(The were form is correct at all times.) Informal ... I wish it were longer. I wish it was longer.

We usually use the subjunctive were instead of "was" after if (and other words with similar meaning). Look at these sentences:
  • If I were you, I would ask her.
  • Suppose she were here. What would you say?

Why do we say "I were", "he were"?

We sometimes hear things like "if I were you, I would go" or "if he were here, he would tell you". Normally, the past tense of the verb "to be" is: I was, he was. But the if I were you structure does not use the past simple tense of the verb "to be". It uses the past subjunctive of the verb "to be". In the following examples, you can see that we often use the subjunctive form were instead of "was" after:
  • if
  • as if
  • wish
  • suppose


Emotion: winkIs this authoritative enough?

We can use 'wish' to express regrets - to say that we would like things to be different. We use a past tense with a present meaning in this case.
I wish I was better-looking.
I wish it wasn't raining.

In a formal style, we can use 'were' instead of 'was' after 'I wish'.
I wish I were better-looking.

(Basic English Usage by Michael Swan)

Based on the above, it is wrong to say using 'was' after 'wish' is wrong. It is informal.

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