As french I am wondering about the use of "avec" in English In this context:
I am coming with a friend of mine
I am coming ALONG with a friend of mine
What is the difference? Thanks.
Second question:
I have heard two people speaking on the radio

My passport was taken from me in Barcelone
and I came back to the UK WITH my driving licence

I am sorry. I guess you felt very bad. After all you came back to your country ON your D.L.
As french I am wondering about the use of "avec" in English In this context: I am coming with a friend of mine I am coming ALONG with a friend of mine What is the difference? Thanks.

In the first sentence, one assumes that two people are traveling together to destination. They appear to have equal motivations or purposes.
In the second, but saying that "I am coming along with..." the speaker indicates that the friend has determined the purpose. I am "along for the ride", or "he is paying my way", or "my friend needs my protection and guidance", etc. Any number of nuances can be implied, but the speaker has subordinated or suppressed his reasons in favor of his friend's.
I am sorry. I guess you felt very bad. After all you came back to your country ON your D.L.

I am not familiar with such border crossings that don't rely on passports and visas. Why would the person feel bad if he still made (apparently legal) border crossings without the passport? Of course, if he wants his passport back, he will have to pay, and to have a huge hassle getting it back. Is that it? Apparently he won't be able to visit Spain without the passport, and perhaps other countries will then be on the lookout because of the nature of his infraction. Is he worried about "identity theft"?
As french I am wondering about the use of "avec" in English In this context: I am coming with a friend of mine I am coming ALONG with a friend of mine What is the difference? Thanks.

There isn't really much difference.
"I am coming with a friend of mine" usually means that you are coming together.
In certain circumstances, "I am coming, ALONG with a friend of mine" (with the comma - or simply a slight pause in the speech) could mean that you and your friend are both coming - but not necessarily together. ("Along with" can mean "as well as", in addition to".)

"I am coming ALONG, with a friend of mine" implies that you will be coming together. ("Coming along" can mean "attending", "participating", "being there" etc.)
However, these differences are very subtle. I am finding it difficult to justify my explanations!
I am sorry. I guess you felt very bad. After all you came back to your country ON your D.L.

Both "with" and "on" mean that the driving licence was used instead of a passport to provide proof of identity. You could say "using" for both.
Ian
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
As french I am wondering about the use of "avec" in English In this context: I am coming with a friend of mine I am coming ALONG with a friend of mine What is the difference? Thanks.

In the first example, both friends are coming to the place; it is not clear if one is accompanying the other. A comma after "coming" would make it clear that the friend was accompanying the speaker. In the second example, it is more likely that the speaker is accompanying his friend: one definition of "come along" in the online Merriem-Webster is "to accompany someone who leads the way". These sentences combine fine distinctions with ambiguous phrasing, and many people would use either one, especially in speech, without intending any difference.
I am sorry. I guess you felt very bad. After all you came back to your country ON your D.L.

This is probably a pun on "DL", which can stand for "driver's licence" or (in American slang, especially among Blacks) "downlow". I'm puzzled by the use of "your"; if the speaker had said "on the DL", "on the downlow", it would be even more likely that he was regretting the other speaker's need to return to his country "surreptitiously" or "in secret".