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Hello.
Are these expressions interchangeable in meaning?

The brothers play with each other.
The brothers play together.
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Hello Latin

I think "play together" is much commoner in talking about the plays between brothers. If I hear "play with each other", I would imagine some special play, but this may be because I am kind of a pervert Emotion: stick out tongue

paco
To me, "play with each other" is more likely to mean that they are playing a game in which both are participating. "Play together" could mean the same thing, or it could mean that they are sitting near each other, each absorbed in his own activity. (This is called "parallel play" in child psychology). But it's a subtle difference - in most cases you could use either one.
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For the same reasons Paco has already mentioned, I would never use the expression "play with each other" in speaking of brothers, sisters, brothers and sisters, or any other combination of children. For some reason "play with their friends" and similar non-reciprocal phrases do not seem objectionable to me in the same way.

CJ
CalifJimI would never use the expression "play with each other" in speaking of brothers, sisters, brothers and sisters, or any other combination of children.
I didn't know that this expression could have some weird implications Emotion: rolleyes . Now, do this apply to other combinations of people too, besides children? If I say: The baseball players play with each other. This is objectionable too?
Hello Latin

I think "play with each other" itself has not any obscene sense. So it's no problem to say like "The boys played with each other till the sunset". The problem is rather that I am now not innocent enough to hear "play with each other" without imagining a queer thing. :( 

paco
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Sorry, Latin. Maybe it's just me, but I read "The baseball players play with each other" in only one way - and they are not playing baseball. "The [men / boys] played baseball (together)" or "They all played baseball" is sufficient. "each other" adds nothing, in my opinion, and it only adds trouble with the verb "play".

CJ
I understand now. But what about other verbs less 'complicated' than play. Going back to my first question, is there any substantial difference in meaning using each other or together in these verbs?

Communicate with each other / together.
Agree with each other / together.
Co-operate with each other / together.
Coincide with each other / together.
Communicate with each other / together.
Agree with each other / together.
Co-operate with each other / together.
Coincide with each other / together.

In all these examples I would be more likely to use "with each other." (Actually you could leave out "with each other " or "together" -- all of the verbs in these examples imply reciprocity.)

I'm trying to think of examples where I would prefer "together" rather than "with each other," and I keep coming back to my earlier feeling that in "with each other" expresses interaction, while "together" stresses companionship (or sometimes a common purpose). I'll be interested to see if others agree with this analysis.

They play golf / go shopping / have dinner together every week. (These activities could be done alone, but they choose to do them together..)

They argue / compete / share secrets with each other. (These things have to be done with someone else; they do them with each other rather than with a variety of other people.)

Here's an interesting example (thanks to my daughter) where the different expression have slightly different meanings:

The brothers fight with each other all the time, but if anyone else attacks either one of them they fight together against the enemy.
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