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With regards to/As for/As to/Regarding/Concerning/According to knowledge and experience, he is superior to other engineers.

As far as knowledge and experience are concerned, he is superior to other engineers.

Are the above versions all but identical in meaning to you? If not, what are the subtle nuances? Thanks.
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[With regard s to/As for/As to/Regarding/Concerning/According to] knowledge and experience, ...

As for and As to are less used with this meaning, IMO.

They're all about the same in meaning, yes.

CJ
Comments  
CalifJim[With regard s to/As for/As to/Regarding/Concerning/According to] knowledge and experience, ...

As for and As to are less used with this meaning, IMO.

They're all about the same in meaning, yes.

CJ
Thanks, Jim.