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Hi,
in the word with or in similar words (without, withstand...), the TH sound can be voiced or unvoiced (voiced as in the, unvoiced as in think).

I'd like to know more about those two ways of pronouncing with. For example, is one way more common? Is one way more related to certain regions? Is one way more related to certain environments? Also, are there people that pronounce with in both ways (that is, you hear both the voiced and the unvoiced way from the same person)?

Thank you.
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Hi Kooyeen,

You asked:
I'd like to know more about those two ways of pronouncing with. For example, is one way more common? Is one way more related to certain regions?
'The unvoiced way' is common when 'with' is followed by a voiceless consonant.

Englishuser
I have played around with this for about an hour, and I cannot find a time when I naturally voice the 'th'. The voicing before a vowel does not, however, sound foreign to me. I just don't think I ever voice it.
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Thank you.

I've always pronounced with and without with a voiced TH (as in there), and absolutely never unvoiced. According to my dictionaries (and according to most of online dictionaries too), both the voiced and the unvoiced pronunciation are standard. But I've heard quite a lot of unvoiced TH in with, so I decided to post something here.

Your comments will be appreciated (maybe Emotion: stick out tongue)
I think I always voice it. I've just been experimenting and when it is unvoiced it sounds like a person with a lisp (to me).
I believe I almost always use the unvoiced version before consonants, and sometimes use the voiced version before vowels. I always use the voiced version for 'without' though.
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Kooyeen,

Same comments as Philip's. I don't think I ever use the voiced th in with, but it sounds fine when others say it.

CJ
In Vegas, the 'TH' voices you.
That's all very interesting. I am from Australia and ALWAYS say the unvoiced "th", as in "thistle".
I'd never even though about pronouncing it otherwise until now.
But I must say, I have heard people use it - exclusively in American movies or on TV.
I have never met an Australian person, or talked to an Australian person, who voices it.
It sounds very foreign to me - and I'd probably notice that the other person was sounding odd if they used it.
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