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"They are not aware of the skeptical origin of the problematic they deal with."

"They are not aware of the skeptical origin of the problematic with which they deal."

In formal writing, is it better to use the second phrasing?

Thanks
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AnonymousIt is grammatically incorrect to end on a preposition.
No, it is not, and it has never been so.
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Isn't problematic an adjective? Did you mean problem?
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I've seen it used as a noun in, e.g., the expression "the Pyrrhonian problematic".
Interesting, thank you.
I think that the "never end a sentence with a preposition" has been pretty well killed off. In my own opinion, "with which they deal" sounds artificial. I would use your first example.

(Although the point about missing a noun remains.)
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Thanks, GG. Yes, it sounded artificial to me, too. That's why I asked.

Regarding the "missing noun", "problematic" has been used as a noun, as I said. If you google it, you'll find the expressions "Pyrrhonian problematic" and "skeptical problematic".

Cheers
Grammar Geek I think that the "never end a sentence with a preposition" has been pretty well killed off. In my own opinion, "with which they deal" sounds artificial. I would use your first example. missing a noun remains.)
Same here.
Sextus
Regarding the "missing noun", "problematic" has been used as a noun, as I said. If you google it, you'll find the expressions "Pyrrhonian problematic" and "skeptical problematic".

Well, when I found problematic as an adjective in Wiktionary.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/problematic

GB.
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Well guys, according to my search results, problematic is an adjective.

1. Wiktionary http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/problematic

2. World Web Online http://www.wordwebonline.com/en/PROBLEMATIC

GB
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