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Hi guys,

Here is a question I've been discussing with some of my friends:

A: Has he finished the job?

B: Yes, and ___ only in an hour.
(A)it (B) with (C)which (D)when

Most of them chose B.

Shouldn't it be "within an hour?" Or is it also OK to write "with in an hour," which comes with huge amount of hits in Google.

By the way, is it OK just to leave the blank intact, or use "that" as an alternative?

I just don't think any of the four choices is standard.

Many thanks!
Comments  
Kevin XA: Has he finished the job?
B: Yes, and ___ only in an hour.

(A)it (B) with (C)which (D)when The best answer is nothing, as you suggest.
None of the four is grammatical, IMHO.

"That" is possible.

"Yes, and within only an hour," is better, but doesn't fit your format.

I'd consider "Yes, and with in only an hour" to be incorrect.
f you want to say that he finished his work in the span of one hour than the best thing to say is "within an hour". Using "with in" is not a good idea because "within" is considered one word.
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Is it possible that the answer is "When"?

A:Has he finished the job? B:Yes, and when only in an hour.
(B) is not grammatical.
Kevin XHere is a question I've been discussing with some of my friends:

A: Has he finished the job?

B: Yes, and ___ only in an hour.
(A)it (B) with (C)which (D)when
I believe there is something faulty with the question itself. Are you sure you have quoted it correctly?

These variants are all correct.

He has finished the job [in / within] (only) an hour.

I find that "in an hour" is more common than "within an hour", though they are equivalent in this context. There is no "with in an hour".

CJ
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AnonymousIs it possible that the answer is "When"?
A:Has he finished the job? B:Yes, and when only in an hour. I don't believe your sentence is possible.
Perhaps, "Yes, and just when the whistle was about to blow."