The below is the original copy of "Istanbul" by Orhan Pamuk, a Nobel Laureate.

It is a useful distinction to make as we “remember” our earliest life experiences, our cradles, our baby carriages, our first steps, all as reported by our parents, stories to which we listen with the same rapt attention we might pay some brilliant tale of some other person.

The below is another copy of the book which was adapted by someone who used this sentence to make a test question.

It is a useful distinction to make as we remember our earliest life experiences reported by our parents, stories to which we listen with the same rapt attention we might pay to some brilliant tale of some other person.

As you can see, there's a difference between two. The latter has "to" followed by "pay." Since "pay" is used as ditransitive verb it has two versions as follows;

▪ Don't pay him any attention.

▪ Don't pay any attention to him.

So it seems ok in the two sentences in question with or without "to."

But when I googled the phrase so many sentences have "to" that it's really hard to find a sentence without "to." Fifteen minutes of checking out goes without a sentence without "to."

So I am becoming curious that there is something I don't know about this.

Is there any chance that the original sentence without "to" cannot be used?

If so, can you tell me why?
Hi,

It's fine. It's just less common, that's all.

Clive
Stenka25we might pay to some brilliant tale of some other person.

As you can see, there's a difference between two. The latter has "to" followed by "pay."
Be careful with "followed". The underlined words are not "to" followed by "pay". They are "pay" followed by "to". Emotion: smile

CJ
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Thanks, Clive.
Thanks, CJ.

I'll make sure that I use the "followed by" in a proper context.

[In this case I think it's proper to use "preceded by."]
Yes. "followed by" and "preceded by" are opposites.

CJ
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