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Hi guys,
I can't find an similar word in my native language for it. Please, can I say, that the woman in US, who works outside the home is actually a woman, who is on the maternity leave, but she also has a job? I found a lot of articles which says that women who works "outside the home" are the ones with the preschool children. Is this phase being called also "maternity leave"?
thanks in advance
Best Regards
JCD
Comments  
Working outside the home and maternity leave have nothing to do with each other, although a woman who has a job outside the home may take maternity leave.

"To work outside the home" is a euphemism which developed a number of years ago in response to the question of a woman, "do you work [have a job]?", implying that if she doesn't have a job, she isn't working.
PhilipWorking outside the home and maternity leave have nothing to do with each other, although a woman who has a job outside the home may take maternity leave.

"To work outside the home" is a euphemism which developed a number of years ago in response to the question of a woman, "do you work [have a job]?", implying that if she doesn't have a job, she isn't working.

Great, thanks Philip!
So, from your answer I feel that.....
woman / mother (my context), who works outside the home = working woman / mother.
Is that equation correct?...Emotion: smile
thanks Philip again.
Best Regards
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Hi,
'Maternity leave' relates to time off work granted to a woman because of the birth of a child.

Details vary widely from country to country.
Here are a few general comments. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maternity_Leave

Best wishes, Clive
Are you trying to say something like this? "She has a job, but right now she's on maternity leave. She'll go back to work in one month."
The thing that Philip alluded to is that any mom who is home all day with her children is also working VERY hard, so there has been some sensitivity to saying that only women with paying jobs outside the home are "working women."

There is also the saying that says " 'Working mother' is a redundant phrase."

(By the way, be careful about the term "working girl," which can be a way to refer to a postitute.)
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Hi guys,
thanks for the replies. Problem is that I can't translate "mother, who works outside the home" directly. Because we simply don't use this expression. In my context that mother simply has someone who watch her preschool kid and during the day she is in work....
Grammar GeekThe thing that Philip alluded to is that any mom who is home all day with her children is also working VERY hard, so there has been some sensitivity to saying that only women with paying jobs outside the home are "working women."

Great GG, I'll try to figure something in this way. Many thx!

Best Regards