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Hi teachers,

This sentence came across me "I was on board USS Enterpriss in the cockpit, on flight deck waiting". (John Smith)

I'd like to know if he was in the cockpit in the moment, how could he have appeared on flight deck at the same time?

"on flight deck waiting" seems to be the "second" action right after "he was on board...cockpit". Would that be correct?

Could the sentence be reworded "I was on board USS Enterpriss in the cockpit, wating on flight deck" to give the same meaning as the original?

Does it sound natural or grammatical to you if the sentence was "I was in the cockpit of USS Enterpriss.....waiting"?

Does it sound natural to write "I was in the cockpit at USS Enterpriss.....waiting"

Thank you.

TN
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tinanam0102Hi teachers,

This sentence came to my attention across me "I was on board USS Enterprise in the cockpit, on flight deck waiting". (John Smith)

I'd like to know if he was in the cockpit in the moment, how could he have appeared on flight deck at the same time? Because the USS Enterprise is an aircraft carrier. The flight deck is the large platform on the carrier where the aircraft take off and land. John Smith is in the cockpit of his plane (he is probably the pilot) , and the plane is on the flight deck, waiting to take off.

"on flight deck waiting" seems to be the "second" action right after "he was on board...cockpit". Would that be correct?

Could the sentence be reworded "I was on board USS Enterpriss in the cockpit, wating on flight deck" to give the same meaning as the original?

Does it sound natural or grammatical to you if the sentence was "I was in the cockpit of USS Enterpriss..waiting"?

Does it sound natural to write "I was in the cockpit at USS Enterpriss..waiting" No. The ship does not have a cockpit. The captain of the ship is on the bridge.




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Hi AlpheccaStars,

Thank you for the pictures and explanation to my questions. The example I gave wasn't very effective in regard to word order. I have this one in mind: "Jane's lost toys were found in Mary's locker with the labels changed to Mary's name."

Could the sequence of the words be like these, "Jane's lost toys were found, with the labels changed to Mary's name, in Mary's locker? (Could you also correct the errors in my question here?) Thank you very much.

Regards,

TN
1) Jane's lost toys were found in Mary's locker with the labels changed to Mary's name.

2) Jane's lost toys were found, with the labels changed to Mary's name, in Mary's locker.

Both of these are OK. In placing phrases, you have to understand what the phrases modify. Some are adjectival and modify a noun, some are adverbial, and modify the verb, and others can modify the entire sentence.

In this case, "with the labels changed to Mary's name" refers to the toys.
"in Mary's locker" is adverbial, and modifies "found"

It is generally best to place the phrases near the words that they modify because they will be easier for the reader to understand. So this order is also possible:

3) Jane's lost toys, with their labels changed to Mary's name, were found in Mary's locker.

Generally, the last phrase in the sentence is the one with the most emphasis, (the "punch line" effect) so I would probably prefer #1 - even though the adjective phrase is separated from its antecedent. It emphasizes that Jane's toys being in Mary's locker probably was no accident.
Could the sequence of the words be like these, "Jane's lost toys were found, with the labels changed to Mary's name, in Mary's locker? (Could you also correct the errors in my question here?)

No! in Mary's locker? is a prep phrase modifying where the toys were found and should be placed as written in the original sentence. By adding a comma and switching the 2 prep phrases, you are actually making the sentence a bit awkward and confusing because your modified order could be read as "the label changing took place in the locker". Comma should be used where its needed. In this case, it unnecessary.
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Hi Goodman,

I thought the comma had an effect there, probably not. I just don't see it why.

Like in, (I'm sorry the following sentence may make others uncomfortable, I apologize in advance) Jane's body was found in her apartment with severe cuts to her body.

Could it work, without losing the original meaning, if I wrote, "Jane's body was found with severe cuts to her body in her apartment"?

Thanks

TN
No! What you did was just changing the cup with the same tea back in my opinion. The reason was already explained clearly.
To further illustrate the comma and prep phrase usage, I will give you this example.

Jane was found unconscious in her apartment last night wearing only a T-shirt by her roomate.

Jane was found unconscious in her apartment last night by her roomate, wearing only a T-shirt.

What do you see? The 2nd one is confusing; isn't it?

Each phrase adds more information to the sentence and we have to make sure the additional information is clearly placed in an understandable fashion.
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Hi Goodman,

I'm sorry I didn't mean to have you explain twice. It's just that I've seen this kind of question. For example, "I want to talk about what happened with the children the other day", compared to "I want to talk about what happened the other day with the children". Both question was deemed ok so I just don't understand. Anyway, thank you.

TN
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