+0
Good evening:

A law officer (B) is being talked about in a case that is held against her father.
A (a lawyer): B won't testify because of her integrity because you, the jury, won't believe that a loving daughter can be objective.
B (sitting in the court): I could so be objective.

How you understand the word "so"? is it an adjective or an adverb? the meaning?

Thanks,

Ench
+0
Hi,
Good evening:

A law officer (B) is being talked about in a case that is held against her father.
A (a lawyer): B won't testify because of her integrity because you, the jury, won't believe that a loving daughter can be objective.
B (sitting in the court): I could so be objective.

How you understand the word "so"? is it an adjective or an adverb? An adverb.

the meaning? I could indeed, in that manner, be objective. The word adds emphasis.

Best wishes, Clive
+0
Enchantedyou, the jury, won't believe that a loving daughter can be objective.
B (sitting in the court): I could so be objective.
This one may depend on the exact intonation of the words. I'm going to take an educated guess.

so
and too act as emphatic affirmative opposites of previous negations. Here, so is used to affirm the previous denial won't.

-- You won't believe it.
-- I will so. / I will too.

-- I'll bet Karen can't reach the top shelf.
-- She can so. / She can too.

-- That's not your sweater.
-- It is so. / It is too.


Repeated affirmations and denials can go like this:

-- You didn't arrive on time, did you?
-- I did so. / I did too.
-- Did not.
-- Did so.
-- Did not.
-- Did so.


CJ