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Hi,

I have a question. What is the rule for stressing the words in noun+noun phrases. For example, "English teacher" would stressed

ENGLISH teacher

or

English TEACHER ?

Which one would mean that this person teaches English, and which of the phrases means he comes from England?

Thank you in advance,

Josh
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.
It normally falls on the first noun (since the first noun is usually modifying-- that is, defining-- the second), but only context can tell you for sure:

A: What's his job?
B: He's an ENGlish teacher.
A: Eh? What did you say? An ENGlish preacher?
B: No! An English TEACHer!


ENGLISH teacher-- teaches the language
English TEACHER-- comes from England
.
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AnonymousWhat is the rule for stressing the words in noun+noun phrases.
There's a primary stress on the first word of the compound; a secondary stress on the second word.
warlord, horseshoe, snowplow, bread line, coffee pot, fall guy, stage fright
Exceptions: Christmas Eve; Christmas Day, mountain ash, rubber check

If the first word is an -ing word, the same stress pattern applies, even though this isn't noun + noun:
washing machine, dining room, swimming pool, looking glass
Exception: weeping willow
Be careful. If the first word is an adjective, the stress is often on the second word of the compound:
remote control, private eye, hired hand, white wine
But it may also be on the first:
long shot, White House, French fries
CJ
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