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Hi,

Could you please advise, are these two words interchangeable? Exactly same meaning?


Police refuse to disclose / reveal the case.

I refuse to disclose / reveal my purchase price.


Cheers

John Aki

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John Akiare these two words interchangeable?

Almost always, yes.

'reveal' is also used in religious contexts (but not 'disclose') to say that some divinity has revealed sacred truths to mankind, but I don't think you're talking about that sort of thing.

'disclose' is also used in political contexts (but not 'reveal') to say that a candidate will (or won't) disclose something about themselves, such as their financial assets, but I don't think you're talking about that, either.

John AkiPolice refuse to disclose / reveal the details of the case.
I refuse to disclose / reveal [my purchase price / what I paid for it].

If you know that there is a case, then that has already been disclosed/revealed, so it makes sense to add "the details of".

"my purchase price" is OK, but if you want a more commonly used expression for use in conversation, I offered you the alternative "what I paid for it".


Nice short post without a thousand examples! Emotion: yes

CJ

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Thanks Mr CJ,

Are these two words interchangeable and exactly same meaning to you?


He charges [ relatively / comparatively ] little for this same phone.

He walks [ relatively / comparatively ] fast for a child of aged three.


Cheers John Aki

John AkiAre these two words interchangeable, and do they have exactly same meaning to you?
relatively / comparatively

Yes. 'comparatively' is a slightly higher register word.

CJ

Thanks Mr CJ


John Aki

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Hi Mr CJ,

Which one is the most correct way in English please?

[ Shell / should / if ] you have any questions please do not hesitate to let me know.


Cheers

John Aki

John Akimost correct

if

Also possible: should

Not possible: shall

CJ

Thank you Mr CJ,

Are these two words interchangeable, and do they have exactly same meaning to you? please advise


I believe this way is the best benefit / interest for your.


Cheers

John Aki

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John Akibenefit / interest

These words are pretty different. They don't have exactly the same meaning.

'interest' is more like curiosity. 'interesting' and 'of interest' mean about the same thing.

I think this book will be [interesting / of interest] for you.

This means I think you will enjoy reading the book.


'It is in your best interest to (do something)' is another usage.

It's in your best interest to avoid selfish friends.

This means you can do some good for yourself if you avoid selfish friends. Avoiding selfish friends is the best course of action for you.

(This is the usage that is more like 'benefit'.)


'benefit' is usually a verb. If something benefits you, it helps you or it gives you an advantage. You profit from it in some way.

The mayor is planning to set up a fund to benefit the poor in our community.


As a noun, it's often 'for the benefit of (someone)'.

The parents and teachers work together for the benefitnoun of the children.

This is about the same as

The parents and teachers work together to benefitverb the children.

CJ

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