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Hi,

Could you please tell me how to differentiate these two words as they seem same meaning to me?

Both mean "guarantee"


I can [ assure / ensure ] you that it is safe.

This medicine will [ assure / ensure ] you a good sleep.

Please [ assure / ensure ] that all lights are switched off.

Your safe can be [ assured / ensured ] in this trip.


Cheers

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I can [ assure / ensure ] you that it is safe.

This medicine will [ assure / ensure ] you a good sleep.
This medicine will ensure/insure that you have a good sleep.

Please [ assure / ensure / be sure] that all lights are switched off.
"be sure" is probably the most natural choice.

Your safe can be [ assured / ensured / insured ] on this trip.

From the American Heritage Dictionary:

Usage Note: Assure, ensure, and insure all mean "to make secure or certain." Only assure is used with reference to a person in the sense of "to set the mind at rest": The ambassador assured the prime minister of his loyalty. Although ensure and insure are generally interchangeable, only insure is now widely used in American English in the commercial sense of "to guarantee persons or property against risk."

CJ

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Thank Mr CJ,

Now I got it, "assure" is more like psycho, and mind thing. Whereas"ensure or insure" are more like physical thing, none of my dictionaries have mentioned the difference between them. (I assure only in the "American Heritage dictionary)


As a body guard, I can assure my loyalty to you. (You are either the king or the president of the United State)

Sir, you can assure my loyalty as a sworn body guard.


Could you check for me if I am in these usages, please?

Don't give (it) wrong, it is $2000 not $200. (Don't misunderstand it, also "it" can be omitted?)

Don't give me wrong, I am happy to help you but not now. (Don't misunderstand me)


Cheers

John Aki

John AkiCould you check for me if I am correct in these usages, please?

You left out a word. Let's do these first.

John Aki

Don't give (it) wrong, it is $2000 not $200. (Don't misunderstand it, also "it" can be omitted?)

Don't give me wrong, I am happy to help you but not now. (Don't misunderstand me)

It's not 'give'. It's 'get'.

Don't get it wrong. ("Don't get the amount wrong" in this case.) You cannot omit "it". It's a reference to something else that was mentioned earlier or that will be mentioned later. Here's how you write it. Note the ; and ,.

Don't get it wrong; it's $2000, not $200.

Don't get me wrong; I'm happy to help you, but not now.

Don't get ___ wrong is a very useful idiom to know.

CJ

John Aki

As a body guard, I can assure my loyalty to you. (You are either the king or the president of the United State)

Sir, you can assure my loyalty as a sworn body guard.

"assure" makes more sense when you assure someone, a person, of something.

I can assure you of my loyalty.

(You can put "as a sworn bodyguard" at the beginning or at the end.)

Examples found online:

Assure him that you don't plan on leaving him out.
My colleagues assure me that greater challenges lie ahead.
How do I assure her that I support her marriage?

The word after "assure" does not always have to be a person, but it very often is, so it's a good idea to remember this pattern.

CJ

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

Thanks Mr CJ for your swift reply,

I wonder how you distinguish these four words? We know "Insure" is more like an insurance side.


I will insure my car before on the road.

This medicine will [ ensure / be sure / make sure ] that you a good sleep. (All are correct maybe)

Please [ ensure / be sure / make sure ] that all lights are switched off. (Be sure and make sure are probably more nature however they all correct?)


Cheers

John Aki

John AkiWe know "Insure" is more like an insurance side.

Right.

I will insure my car before I take it on the road.
You've been leaving out a lot of words today.Emotion: smile

This medicine will [ ensure / be sure / make sure ] that you a good sleep. (All are correct maybe) I would use only "ensure". Generally speaking, only people can 'be sure' or 'make sure'.

Please [ ensure / be sure / make sure ] that all lights are switched off. (Be sure and make sure are probably more nature however they all correct?)
All correct. People can do all three of those things.

CJ

Thanks Mr CJ,

English is truly a difficult language, too many synonymous words to understand them.


I am certain that this most reliable airplane will ensure your safety. (Thing only)

I will [ ensure / be sure / make sure ] that you have wonderful time in my home. (For people)


I guess these four words [ sustain / maintain / remain / retain ] are all mean "continue" and "still".

however the usage are slight different, please check for me if I have made any mistakes?


This country [ remains / retains ] independence since 1950. (Both are correct, retain is more formal and higher register word?)

This house [ remains / retains ] much of it's original charm. (Same as above)

He [ remains / retains ] his tennis title for third year.

This plane [ remains / retains ] moisture well.

I [ remain / retain ] clear memory about my childhood.

Nothing good [ remained / retained ] on this car, all parts were broken and rusty.


This vintage car [ maintain / remain / retain ] well. (Only first one is correct?)

This brand has [ sustained / maintained / remained / retained ] a good reputation since 50s. (Only first two are correct?)


We do appreciate you taking your time to helping us.

John Aki

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John Aki too many synonymous words

Yes, but you don't need all those words. Emotion: smile

If you can read, write, say, and understand half of the words you've been studying, you should be fine. The problem is not learning new words; it's having complete mastery over those you already know.


I am certain that this most reliable airplane will ensure your safety. (Thing only) OK.

I will [ ensure / be sure / make sure ] that you have wonderful time in my home. (For people) OK.


I guess these four words [ sustain / maintain / remain / retain ] are all mean "continue" and "still".

However the usage are slightly different, can you please check for me if I have made any mistakes?

This country [ remains / has retained ] independence since 1950.

You need the present perfect tense with "since 1950".

'remain' is intransitive, so it can't have an object. One possibility is to follow 'remain by an adjective or a prepositional phrase.

remains unclear; remains poor; remains in doubt

'remains' = 'is still', so it goes where you put 'is still', and this makes it a linking verb. Here are some cases where you can follow 'remain' with a noun:

remains a mystery (is still a mystery); remains a world power (is still a world power)


This house [ remains / retains ] much of it's its original charm. (Same as above)

You can't say "This house is still its charm".

He [ remains / retains ] his tennis title for third year.

You can't say "He is still his tennis title".

This plane [ remains / retains ] moisture well.

You can't say "This place is still moisture".

I [ remain / retain ] clear memory about my childhood.

You can't say "I am still clear memory".

"retain clear memory about" is not very natural either. Use the following pattern.

I still retain a clear memory of my childhood.

Nothing good [ remained / retained ] on this car; all the parts were broken and rusty.

Clearly this is "Nothing good was still on this car".


This vintage car [ maintain / remain / retain ] well. (Only first one is correct? No. Not even that one.)

Here's what you mean: This vintage car has been well maintained.

This brand has [ sustained / maintained / remained / retained ] a good reputation since 50s. (Only first two are correct? And 'retained'.)

'maintained' is quite possible with 'reputation', but 'sustained' is rarely seen in that combination (but it's not wrong).

Although you don't seem to think so, 'retained a good reputation' is OK.

CJ

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