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Hi,

Could you please check for me if I am correct in these meaning of the following sentences?


Announce (to inform officially)

The pilot [ announced / pronounced ] that the flight would be delayed.

The senator __ [ announced / pronounced ] to run for the mayor.

The mayor [ announced / pronounced ] the new traffic regulation. (Can be both?)

Pronounce (to state officially)

The judge [ pronounced / announced ] the verdict.

The doctor [ pronounced / announced ] he was dead at this morning.

I now [ pronounced / announced ] you man and wife.


That noise really [ annoyed / irritated ] me. (make me angry, irritate is worse)

The way he was speaking really [ annoyed / irritated ] me. (make me angry, irritate is worse)

There wasn't enough space to accommodate the files. (store)


Thanks in advance

John Aki

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Announce (to inform officially)

The pilot [ announced / pronounced ] that the flight would be delayed. OK.

The senator __ [ announced / pronounced ] to that he would run for the mayor. As shown.

The mayor [ announced / pronounced ] the new traffic regulation. (Can it be both?) No. Just 'announced'.


Pronounce (to state officially)

The judge [ pronounced / announced ] the verdict. OK. 'announced' also OK.

The doctor [ pronounced / announced ] he was dead at this morning.
pronounced him dead this morning.

I now [ pronounced / announced ] you man and wife.
pronounce (If it's "now", it's not in the past, so no "d".)


That noise really [ annoyed / irritated ] me. (make me angry, irritate is worse yes)
OK.

The way he was speaking really [ annoyed / irritated ] me. (make me angry, irritate is worse) OK.


There wasn't enough space to accommodate the files. (store) Almost too formal for everyday use, but possible. We'd probably say only "There wasn't enough space for the files".

By the way, accommodate doesn't exactly mean 'store'.

To accommodate something is provide space for it. To store something is to keep it (in a particular place).

However, in your sentence, both words are OK.

CJ

Comments  

Maybe "provide" is a better translation of the word "accommodate"?

There wasn't enough space to accommodate the files. (provide)

The road will be closed a line to accommodate the crane's movement. (provide)

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
John Aki

Maybe "provide" is a better translation of the word "accommodate"?

There wasn't enough space to accommodate the files. (provide)

The road will be closed a line to accommodate the crane's movement. (provide)

No. 'provide' is not better.

'accommodate' already includes the idea of providing, namely, providing space.

The road will be closed to accommodate the crane. (This is enough.)
(to provide space for the crane; to make room for the crane)

More often we say "to make room for". "accommodate" is more appropriate in formal writing than in ordinary conversation.

CJ


Thanks Mr CJ,

Here are what I don't understand, the "mayor" publish a regulation is considered to be "state officially" rather then just "inform"?

Same as a judge, they both are officially state important information in writing.

The senator announced that he would run for the mayor. (This is just "inform" to us, more like a news to me. Nothing to do with law or serious. Please advise your thought.


The mayor [ announced (inform) / pronounced (state) ] the new traffic regulation. Just 'announced.

The judge [ pronounced (state) / announced (inform) ] the verdict.


Thanks again in advance

John Aki

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John AkiHere are is what I don't understand, the mayor published a regulation is considered to be "stated officially" rather then just "informed"?

Neither. Publishing means writing down and putting the regulation into print. Announcing the regulation means telling people (usually in a formal setting) that the regulation exists. It has been established. In both publishing and in announcing, the mayor is informing the people. Announcing is just stating in order to inform people. Publishing means written, so it isn't "stating" (unless you specify "stated in writing").

John AkiSame as a judge, they both are officially state important information in writing.

You can say 'state in writing' or 'publish'. Those are basically the same. It doesn't have to be official, and you don't have to be a judge. Anybody can 'state in writing' or 'publish'.

John AkiThe senator announced that he would run for mayor. (This is just to "inform" to us, more like news to me. Nothing to do with law or serious. Please advise.

Correct. You can announce anything. Typically, it's something you think is important. People announce the birth of a baby; they announce a marriage; they announce a death in the family. Actually, come to think of it, those kinds of announcements can be written. They usually appear in local newspapers.

John AkiThe mayor [ announced (inform) / pronounced (state) ] the new traffic regulation. Just 'announced'.

Correct. Just 'announced'. Note that in a democratic system, officials do not pronounce regulations or laws.

John AkiThe judge [ pronounced (state) / announced (inform) ] the verdict.

You can have either one. If the case is held without a jury, as some cases are in the U.S., the judge is the person who decides 'guilty' or 'not guilty', so he/she pronounces the verdict. If the case is held with a jury, technically the jury pronounces (decides and states) the verdict, but the judge can also announce it (when he tells the public at large how the jury decided).


I'm not sure I've answered your question. You seem a little uncertain about these words, and I don't know what's causing the trouble.

CJ

Thanks Mr CJ,

I am fully understanding these two words now.


Cheers

John Aki

Hi Mr CJ,

Do you think I can express these two words in these ways?


1) The mayor, president and judge....etc usually go with an "announce" due to they don't make a decision but only a "inform" us the decision.

2) The pilot, you or me generally go with an "announce" (inform) people that...

2) The doctor, jury, judge (In some cases, light offences), priest and legislator....etc usually go with a "pronounce". As they tend to make a decision, therefore more like a "state".


Cheers

John Aki

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John Aki

Hi Mr CJ,

Do you think I can express these two words in these ways?


1) The mayor, president and judge....etc usually go with an "announce" due to they don't make a decision but only a "inform" us the decision.

2) The pilot, you or me generally go with an "announce" (inform) people that...

2) The doctor, jury, judge (In some cases, light offences), priest and legislator....etc usually go with a "pronounce". As they tend to make a decision, therefore more like a "state".


Cheers

John Aki

Right. Emotion: smile

CJ