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Hi,

Could you please comment on these sentences for me, both words mean "chaos".


Your unexpected visit caused [ confusion / disruption ] . (Both are correct?)

This country is in a state of [ confusion / disruption ] under the civil war. (Both are correct?)

The strike have caused traffic [ confusion / disruption ] this morning. (Both are correct?)

The building site is causing traffic [ confusion / disruption ] in the surrounding area. (Both are correct?)


Cheers

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Comments  

All four of the given sentences use "disruption." The word "confusion" typically refers directly to a person's state of mind, and none of the four result in a person's mind being directly affected.

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Thanks both,

How about this time, more accurate for these two words?


After the bomb blast, everyone was in the state of confusion. (Chaos, refers to people)

Your unexpected visit caused disruption. (Chaos, refer to things)

This country is in a state of disruption under the civil war.

The strike have caused traffic disruption this morning.

The building site is causing traffic disruption in the surrounding area.


Thanks in advance

John Aki

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