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1. Does the use of the word 'successful' make sense in a context like this:


"Having a successful pregnancy at age 45 is really prowess."



Note: By 'successful', I mean a normal pregnancy and delivery.



2. And does the word 'deed' make sense in a context like this:



"Having a successful pregnancy at age 45 is a real deed."



Note: By 'deed', I mean a great achievement.

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1. Does the use of the word 'successful' make sense in a context like this:

"Having a successful pregnancy at age 45 is really prowess."Yes, but he word 'prowess' is not natural. Try to find another. eg an accomplishment.

Note: By 'successful', I mean a normal pregnancy and delivery.



2. And does the word 'deed' make sense in a context like this:


"Having a successful pregnancy at age 45 is a real deed."

No, not natural. Say eg a great achievement.


Note: By 'deed', I mean a great achievement.

Comments  

The word successful makes sense in your first sentence. The word prowess, however, does not. Prowess is used to refer to "bravery and valour" when doing something, and is mostly used when describing combat. An example sentence for prowess would be "The knight fought with great prowess."


In your second sentence, deed does not make sense. "Having a successful pregnancy at age 45 is an impressive deed" would make sense to an English speaker, but really "Having a successful pregnancy at age 45 is really impressive" sounds a lot better. A "deed" is mostly something done for someone else.

 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.