Back in the 1995 - 1997 we had a discussion on this group on the 27 words in the English language for a body of flowing water. I can't find the thread on Google archives. Does anyone happen to have a copy of the final list? If not, could we try to reconstitute it with contributions from one and all?
Many thanks
Peter

"A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware"- Rupert Brooke, "The Soldier"

Peter J. Lusby
San Diego, California, USA
http://www.edgarglobal.com
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Back in the 1995 - 1997 we had a discussion on this group on the 27 words in the English ... a copy of the final list? If not, could we try to reconstitute it with contributions from one and all?

There's a discussion on that topic during that time period, but it's in sci.lang, not alt.usage.english, and it doesn't reach 27, not that I see. Look for this:

Subject: Re: English river names (was: EU's language policy) Newsgroups: sci.lang, alt.uu.lang.misc, eunet.politics, soc.culture.europe, alt.politics.europe.misc,
talk.politics.european-union
Date: 1996/02/11

Best Donna Richoux
Back in the 1995 - 1997 we had a discussion ... try to reconstitute it with contributions from one and all?

Thanks for that cite, but it's not the thread I was looking for. The thread was definitely in AUE, because I recall starting it, and I've never been to any of the groups with Colin's thread. I wonder why it wasn't archived.
I may misremember the number now. It was a long time ago. Perhaps it was only 23, not 27. I do remember that we discounted alternative spellings. I also recall that there was considerable controversy over whether or not "tarn" should be included, and in the end the consensus was to leave it in.
Here are the 16 I can remember so far - feel free to add your own contributions.
beck
bourne/burn
brook
creek/crick
ghyll
leat
race
rill
rindle
river
rivulet
runlet
runnel
stream
tarn
torrent
Regards
Peter

"A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware"- Rupert Brooke, "The Soldier"

Peter J. Lusby
San Diego, California, USA
http://www.lusby.org
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Peter Lusby:
beck bourne/burn brook creek/crick ghyll leat race rill rindle river rivulet runlet runnel stream tarn torrent

Run.
Kill, if you count it as English.
Rapids, if you count it as a kind of stream and not a feature in a stream. Cascade, with the same qualification.
Estuary, if you count it as flowing.

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My text in this article is in the public domain.
Thanks for that cite, but it's not the thread I was looking for. The thread was definitely in AUE, because ... add your own contributions. beck bourne/burn brook creek/crick ghyll leat race rill rindle river rivulet runlet runnel stream tarn torrent

Some from searching AHD for definitions containing 'stream'-

arroyo (AHD 2. A brook; a creek.)
wadi
millrace
(those three, like watercourse, can refer to the channel or the water).

flume
freshet
tributary
affluent
distributary
effluent
coulee
gill (probably the same as ghyll)

john
Here are the 16 I can remember so far - feel free to add your own contributions.. tarn

Would you consider tarns to be flowing water? I've always thought of them as high-altitude lakes or ponds, not flowing much.

Here are a few more:
ria
anabranch
branch
billabong
bogue (no doubt the adjectival form is "bogous")
confluence
feeder
canal
rigolet
sike
snye
spruit
streamlet
swallet
wash
linn (a waterfall or torrent of rushing water in a river or stream) pokelogan (marshy or stagnant water that has branched off from a stream or lake)

Ray Heindl
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Here are the 16 I can remember so far - feel free to add your own contributions.

tarn

Would you consider tarns to be flowing water? I've always thought of them as high-altitude lakes or ponds, not flowing ... water in a river or stream) pokelogan (marshy or stagnant water that has branched off from a stream or lake)

Thanks for the list. I'd already rejected "canal" along with words like "tributary", "feeder" and "confluence" as not really fitting the criteria.

A "linn" (also "lin" and "lynn") is more a feature of a river or stream than a reasonable synonym.
"Spruit" (also "sluit") I class with "wadi" and "arroyo" as loan words that may have considerable currency, but are not yet thought of as "english".
I thought "billabong" means "pond" rather than "stream".

I can't find a dictionary reference to many of the other words, though "bogue" or "boc" seems to be a fish, according to my Websters.

I'd love to find references for words like "swallet" and "snye" - can you give me cites?
Regards
Peter

"A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware"- Rupert Brooke, "The Soldier"

Peter J. Lusby
San Diego, California, USA
http://www.lusby.org
On the Somerset levels they have waterways called "drains". Honest.
I'd love to find references for words like "swallet" and "snye" - can you give me cites?

http://www.webster-dictionary.org/definition/Swallet

It doesn't seem to be in my NSOED, but it's used in a part of Britain (Somerset) where I lived for a while to describe a feature of the landscape where floodwater will vanish underground. Googling will turn up several examples.
Matti
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