At it is asserted that the words and phrases in the left column below, all commonplace in American English, were formerly, but no longer are, current in England. Could a.u.e.ers comment on the truthfulness of this claim? "Plumb", meaning "completely", does not surprise me; it sounds like something Shakespeare might say and rural Americans might say, but it might seem out of place if used by a 21st-century English person or an urban American. That the British do not now use the word "noon" is a considerable surprise to me. Similarly "zero". "Rooster" perhaps less so.
attic a loft; the topmost story of a house back and forth as in backwards and forwards
bug any kind of insect
bushel a common unit of measurement
cabin a humble dwelling
deck a pack of cards
hog a pig
jack a knave within a deck of cards
junk as in rubbish
rear as in raising an animal or child
noon midday (originally nones, the ninth hour of daylight, or 3pm plumb as being complete
rooster a male fowl
zero as in nought
Mike Hardy
1 2 3 4 5 6
At it is asserted that the words and phrases in the left column below, all commonplace in American ... a considerable surprise to me. Similarly "zero". "Rooster" perhaps less so. attic a loft; the topmost story of a house

Common and usual. What else would you call it? A loft is not the same thing at all in BrE.
bushel a common unit of measurement

I doubt that one is now "common" anywhere.
hog a pig

A hog is specifically a male pig.
jack a knave within a deck of cards

Much more common than "knave", I think.
junk as in rubbish

Common. Not at all the same thing as rubbish, though.
noon midday (originally nones, the ninth hour of daylight, or 3pm

At least as common as "midday".
zero as in nought

Common.
I have seen this kind of list of "American words the British don't use" often enough. Usually, they are at least 50% dead wrong.

Don Aitken
Mail to the addresses given in the headers is no longer being read. To mail me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com".
At it is asserted that the words and phrases in the left column below, all commonplace in American ... (originally nones, the ninth hour of daylight, or3pm plumb as being complete rooster a male fowl zero as in nought

#s 1, 2, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 14 are all normal in BrEng, as are: gung-ho, 'neck of the woods', barbecue, hammock and tycoon. And I wouldn't be that surprised to hear any of the rest, or cookie, "cafe au lait", praline, toboggan, skunk, adobe, desperado, maize, pronto, shlep, shmuck, honcho, cape (=headland), closet (=cupboard), mad (=angry), or stocks (=shares). (The words I've added are also on Wikipedia's US-English lists.)

Adrian
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
In our last episode,
, the lovely and talented Michael J Hardy
broadcast on alt.usage.english:
At it is asserted that the words and phrases in the left column below, all commonplace in American ... nones, the ninth hour of daylight, or 3pm plumb as being complete rooster a male fowl zero as in nought

I have my doubts about most of these.
"Gotten" is no longer common in British English, but occurs I think in a few very old idioms and trite phrases such as "ill-gotten gains."

Lars Eighner finger for geek code (Email Removed) http://www.io.com/~eighner / The average, healthy, well-adjusted adult gets up at seven-thirty in the morning feeling just plain terrible. Jean Kerr
attic a loft; the topmost story of a house

Common and usual. What else would you call it? A loft is not the same thing at all in BrE.

It is in this house.
hog a pig

A hog is specifically a male pig.

Didn't know that. Are you sure? Chambers' lead definition is "a general name for swine".
jack a knave within a deck of cards

Much more common than "knave", I think.

Very much more common.
Adrian

b. England 1966; SE Cheshire -1986; Birmingham to date
There appears to be another distinction between an AmE hog and a BrE one: The Cambridge dictionaries don't make a reference to an exact weight, but The Collins English Dictionary at
http://www.wordreference.com/english/definition.asp?en=hog

says of a hog that it is "1 a domesticated pig, esp. a castrated male weighing more than 102 kg."
*Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary,* 11th ed., on the other hand, defines a hog as "1 : a domestic swine especially when weighing more than
120 pounds (54 kilograms); broadly : any of various wild and domesticswine." Another American dictionary, the AHD4 at
http://www.bartleby.com/61/28/H0232800.html
gives the exact same weight in its definition.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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In our last episode, the lovely and talented Michael J Hardy broadcast on alt.usage.english:

At it is asserted that the words and ... being complete rooster a male fowl zero as in nought

I have my doubts about most of these.

As being used in the U.S. or as not being used in Britain?

I (from the US) use most of the words pretty much as shown. The exceptions would be (1) I wouldn't use "loft" and "attic" to mean the same thing; (2) only a full-grown pig can be called a "hog"; (3) "junk" may or may not be "rubbish"; and (4) "noon" means 12:00 PM to me while "midday" (a term I rarely use) means the middle of the day, generally later than noon.
Btw, I think "plumb" came to be used for "complete" or "totally" because something "plumb" is totally straight, perfectly vertical. (I also use plumb in other senses, as I'm sure Ron Draney does.)

And even though I was born on a farm which would make me "rural," at least at that time I've been living in urban areas for many years. It may be that Americans who do not use most of the terms listed above are young compared to my "fifty-ten" or live on one of the coasts, where people may not know from bushels, as RF might say.
"Gotten" is no longer common in British English, but occurs I think in a few very old idioms and trite phrases such as "ill-gotten gains."

People have said that "gotten" is fading in the U.S. I wish that weren't so, but it probably is.

Maria Conlon
Please send any email to the Hot Mail address.
At it is asserted that the words and phrases in the left column below, all commonplace in American ... British do not now use the word "noon" is a considerable surprise to me. Similarly "zero". "Rooster" perhaps less so.

comments below from my UK English point of view:
attic a loft; the topmost story of a house

attic and loft are different, and we use both
back and forth as in backwards and forwards

sounds OK
bug any kind of insect

this has entered the language over the last 20 years and is now fairly common, especially among youngsters
bushel a common unit of measurement

recognised but not used, although it may still be current in farming
cabin a humble dwelling

sounds American
deck a pack of cards

standard
hog a pig

not in common usage, but may be part of farming language
jack a knave within a deck of cards

the standard term
junk as in rubbish

standard
rear as in raising an animal or child

not exactly everyday, but unremarkable
noon midday (originally nones, the ninth hour of daylight, or 3pm

what? perfectly standard
plumb as being complete

Not used - reminds me of Deputy Dawg
rooster a male fowl

not so common as cockerel
zero as in nought

standard
Mike Hardy

I don't have much cause to say this one.

David
==
At it is asserted that the words and ... so. attic a loft; the topmost story of a house

I lived in a 3 story house once. The top 2 rooms were full of junk and were called the attic.
back and forth as in backwards and forwards bug any kind of insect bushel a common unit of measurement cabin a humble dwelling

Only for rooms in ships or aircraft.
deck a pack of cards hog a pig jack a knave within a deck of cards

Common.
junk as in rubbish

Common.
rear as in raising an animal or child noon midday (originally nones, the ninth hour of daylight, or

3pm

Fairly common.
plumb as being complete rooster a male fowl zero as in nought

Common
#s 1, 2, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 14 are all normal in BrEng, as are: gung-ho, 'neck of ... honcho, cape (=headland), closet (=cupboard), mad (=angry), or stocks (=shares). (The words I've added are also on Wikipedia's US-English lists.)

The only 'Capes' I've heard of are marked on maps. eg Cape Wrath.

Mike

M.J.Powell
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