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(snip)
Here is my (re)submission:

(appallingly loathesome sentence snipped)
That sentence was written by Richard Buckminster Fuller, the father of geodesy.

Fuller was the father of the geodesic dome, but geodesy dates to the sixteenth century, a bit before his time.
It was published in T-Square magazine in February 1932. That was Buckie's big year, the year he finally got moving and made his mark, so there must be something meaningful somewhere in there. But who can spot it? Not me. It's crap. It means nothing.

I can't tell whether it means anything or not, as I'm too lazy to try to decipher it. But any sentence that long is bound to be a bad one. Are you sure he didn't intend it as a parody? I'd hate to think he really meant that.

Ray Heindl
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Where's Charles when he's needed? James Joyce has a single sentence chapter in one of his high-modernist books ( Ulysses or Finnegans Wake ). It goes on for pages.

After a lot of deliberation and more drink than is good for me, the commission has finally come up with this:
Rule 3: Authors who write in a deliberately meaningless fashion are excluded.
But please let this be the last of the quibbling. The commission's only intention was to throw up a few examples of windy bollocks. Must these bollocks buffet their way through a cacophony of cavilling and litigiousness before they can even hope of reaching the starting line?

I sincerely hope not. Let us orchestrate a bold new beginning.

More bollocks, please.

Mickwick,
the universally concerned intellectual optic of integrity
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Then I conclude that it is not a sentence, and ineligible for the prize. Next!

Er .. Er ... Oh, bugger it, you know what I mean. The longest bit of *** ever contained to the left of a single full-stop. How's that? Not as an entry, as a definition?

Okay, rule definition agreed. Entry reinstated.
The odd thing is that I can read the entry and think that I am processing it correctly for a bit before I hit the wall.

Do you think that Fuller knew what he meant to say?

I was given one of his books some years ago, and got to the second page. It's sitting in the (large) pile of books to which I mean to return when I have the time. Like eternity.
PB
Then I conclude that it is not a sentence, and ineligible for the prize. Next!

Er .. Er ... Oh, bugger it, you know what I mean. The longest bit of *** ever contained to the left of a single full-stop. How's that? Not as an entry, as a definition?

Okay, rule definition agreed. Entry reinstated.
The odd thing is that I can read the entry and think that I am processing it correctly for a bit before I hit the wall.

Do you think that Fuller knew what he meant to say?

I was given one of his books some years ago, and got to the second page. It's sitting in the (large) pile of books to which I mean to return when I have the time. Like eternity.
PB
Thus spake Mickwick:

Where's Charles when he's needed? James Joyce has a single ... or Finnegans Wake ). It goes on for pages.

Molly's soliloquy (odd: I think it is the first time I ever typed or wrote the word) at the end ... of praise more in keeping with Joyce's place in the divine order. Yes I say yes he will yes. PB

There's also a massive sentence in Infinite Jest five or six pages of the thing, IIRC in crackheadspeak, to boot, yet it's all perfectly comprehensible, so it's disqualified from Mickwick's competition.
I'm only about a third of the way through *IJ*, but must admit that this lad Wallace (down, Mark, not you) can write. And write. And write.
**
Ross Howard
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Ross Howard filted:
Molly's soliloquy (odd: I think it is the first time ... the divine order. Yes I say yes he will yes.

There's also a massive sentence in Infinite Jest* five or six pages of the thing, IIRC in crackheadspeak, ... way through *IJ, but must admit that this lad Wallace (down, Mark, not you) can write. And write. And write.

I thought I remembered a behemoth of a sentence in one of George Washington's inaugural addresses (probably the second one), that made up the whole of a longer-than-average paragraph all by its lonesome, but either Bartleby's got hold of an abridged version or it was somebody else's speech...I plead the passage of thirty years in defense of what's left of my memory..r
That sentence was written by Richard Buckminster Fuller, the father of geodesy.

You mean geodesic domes. Geodesy is a branch of surveying, dealing with distances long enough for the earth's curvature to be important.
It was published in T-Square magazine in February 1932. That was Buckie's big year, the year he finally got moving and made his mark, so there must be something meaningful somewhere in there.

It is possible for people to do something valuable without being able to say anything valuable about it.

Joe Fineman (Email Removed)
What is the longest and least coherent sentence ever written and published in English? Length and meaning are separate matters ... must be something meaningful somewhere in there. But who can spot it? Not me. It's crap. It means nothing. Next!

The ideal of modern architecture being not only to provide survival function, but to make the mechanics of life so effortless and natural that it frees people's minds from the mundane, so that the ego, being liberated from temporal concerns, can merge into the eternal now, which is only available to a mind wholesomely occupied with universal, rather than local concerns.
More of a parenthetical statement, maybe, since it's not quite a sentence.

john
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What is the longest and least coherent sentence ever written and published in English? Length and meaning are separate matters ... blinds the ego to the infinity of the eternal "now", visible only through the universally concerned intellectual optics of integrity.

Can anyone identify the main verb? I can't.
The best I can suggest is that the word "being" in the first line be changed to "is". Then, at least, it would qualify as a "sentence".
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