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I am quite puzzled by the "woulds" in the following sentences. Why didn't the writer simply put everything in the past tense?

1. He had high blood pressure. He complained of blurred vision. He had insomnia. Soon he would develop an aneurysm and gout.

[why not "..he developed..."?]

2. By then, they were old enough to hunt and fish with their father, and this is what he lived for. In later years, his sons would talk about this as the best times they had together.

[why not "...his sons talked about..."?]

3. Unfortunately, after the dispute with Dos Passos, Hemingway lost his last friend who was a writer or artist. For the rest of his life, he would hang out only with sportsmen, soldiers, celebrities, and fans, but never with other creative men and women.

[why not "...he hung out only with..."?]
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Comments  
Because the author is talking about some event in the past compared to a past event.

See the examples:

Talking about past events:
He had high blood pressure. || He complained of blurred vision. || He had insomnia. || Soon he developed aneurysm and gout. ||{moment of speech - a present moment}||
Aneurysm and gout have already developed.

Talking about present events:
He has high blood pressure. || He complains of blurred vision. || He has insomnia. || {moment of speech - a present moment}|| Soon he will develop aneurysm and gout.
Aneurysm and gout haven't yet developed, but it's likely to happen soon.

Future in the past:
He had high blood pressure. || He complained of blurred vision. || He had insomnia. || {moment of speech - a past moment}|| Soon he would develop aneurysm and gout.
Aneurysm and gout hadn't yet developed (by the moment of speech), but they were likely to happen soon.

The same goes for the other sentences.

Hope that helps!

See also
Why would?

All three are examples of "was going to" would -- at least, I call it that! The idea is that you are to take the point of view of the past and imagine what was going to happen later in the story, as if you didn't know from your present viewpoint what actually did happen later as the story continued.

CJ
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I am quite puzzled by the "woulds" in the following sentences. Why didn't the writer simply put everything in the past tense?

1. He had high blood pressure. He complained of blurred vision. He had insomnia. Soon he would develop an aneurysm and gout.
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Recently Marius and a few others taught me the different ways of use the word 'would'.

He had high blood pressure and other problems. So he runs the risk of getting other complications such as gout.
In some way these are assumptions. In other words hypothetical.
So it is proper to write :
Soon he would develop an aneurysm and gout.

On the other hand if you are 100% sure that he gets other complications, you can write:
Soon he will develop an aneurysm and gout.
[ There is no hypothesis here.]

I urge CalifJim and Ruslana to correct me If I am wrong.
I know CalifJim for a couple of years. He is very clever at English grammar.

I recognize even Ruslana. Because she contributes to the Russian forum.
However, I am using some other names to the Russian forum. Nowdadays I don't study Russian. I have close contacts with four beautiful Russian girls to practice my Russian.

RotterOn the other hand if you are 100% sure that he gets other complications, you can write: Soon he will develop an aneurysm and gout.
[ There is no hypothesis here.]
Would is used here whether there is hypothesis or not. Will is used when the future is being viewed from the present. Would is used if the future is being viewed from the past. This stands even when the future event is in the future relative to the present.

For example: "He told me yesterday (Monday) he would be flying to London on Friday".
Bokeh wrote the following:

For example: "He told me yesterday (Monday) he would be flying to London on Friday".
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The above has different grammar aspects. You should maintain the same tense in a sentence.

1. He said he will go to London. [ Everybody understands this sentence.]

2. He said he would go to London. [ This is the correct one.]

I hope CalfJim or Ruslana will read my post and give me a reply.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
RotterBokeh wrote the following:

For example: "He told me yesterday (Monday) he would be flying to London on Friday".
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The above has different grammar aspects. You should maintain the same tense in a sentence.
What do you mean? Told is the past of tell and would is the past of will. Where is the lack of concordance of tense?
Hi,
I am sick. ------------> He told me he is sick. (not backshifted) /// He told me he was sick. (backshifted)
I will try to do it. ---> He told me he will try to do it. (not backshifted) /// He told me he would try to do it. (backshifted)

End of the story. I hope you liked it Emotion: wink
KooyeenEnd of the story.
Kooyeen, although everyone would understand those mixed tenses, prescriptive grammar (which I know you despise) has a strict set of rules how each tense in direct quoted speech should be transposed into reported speech.
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