+0
Hello. I wrote two dialogues. Will you correct them?

No. 1

M: I've got a return ticket to Tokyo the day after tomorrow.

I'd like to reconfirm my [ the ] reservation.

F: Sure. Can I get [ have ] your name?

M: Yes, my name is Carl Coast.

No. 2

M: I normally don't prescribe antibiotics for colds. But yours is quite [ rather ] serious.

( 'I don't normally' is also OK? )

F: You mean I should take antibiotics?

M: Exactly. You can't drink while ( you are ) taking them.

Thank you. kenta
+0
No. 1

M: I've got a return ticket to Tokyo for the day after tomorrow. -- this means you are travelling the day after tomorrow

I'd like to reconfirm my [ the ] reservation.

F: Sure. Can I get [ have ] your name? -- "get your name" is not terribly natural to me (though perfectly intelligible). I would say "have your name" or "take your name". "get your name" may be more natural in American English; I'm not sure.

M: Yes, my name is Carl Coast.

No. 2

M: I normally don't prescribe antibiotics for colds. But yours is quite [ rather ] serious.

( 'I don't normally' is also OK? ) -- yes, both are OK. "don't normally" would come more naturally to me in conversation

F: You mean I should take antibiotics?

M: Exactly. You can't drink while ( you are ) taking them. -- in conversation I would usually say "while you're taking them", but "you're" is not grammatically necessary -- the sentence works without it. "drink" often is used to mean "drink alcohol" (as I assume you mean here), but to avoid confusion I think it would be better to explictly say so in this case.
Comments  
Hi, Mr Wordy. You explained to me very precisely. Thank you very much!

kenta