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Hello. I wrote two dialogues. Would you check them?

No. 1

M: What do you think he was trying to express with his novel?

F: I don't come up with any comments about it. It's too abstract.

M: Really? I was impressed with it very much.

No. 2

F: It's time we washed all the windows around the house.

M: Can't you wait until this weekend? I have a lot ( of things ) to do.

F: Well... it's OK, but keep in mind ( that ) you say you will do it.

Thank you! kenta
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Hi Kenta,

No. 1

M: What do you think he was trying to express in/with his novel?

F: I don't didn't / can't come up with any comments about it. It's too abstract.

M: Really? I was impressed with it very much.

No. 2

F: It's time we washed all the windows around the house.

M: Can't you wait until this weekend? I have a lot ( of things ) to do.

F: Well... it's OK, but keep in mind ( that ) you say said you will do it.

Clive
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KentaNo. 1

M: What do you think he was trying to express with his novel? Some might prefer "in his novel, but I think "with" is fine.

F: I don't come up with any comments about it. It's too abstract. "I don't come up with" may be a bit casual, but perhaps that's what you want.

M: Really? I was impressed with it very much.

No. 2

F: It's time we washed all the windows around the house.

M: Can't you wait until this weekend? I have a lot ( of things ) to do.

F: Well... it's OK, but keep in mind ( that ) you say you will do it. People sometimes put it this way, but I think the tense would be more nearly correct as present perfect:

- but keep in mind what you have said.

- but keep in mind that you [have] said you would / will do it. ("keep in mind" is imperative, but present tense (simple?))

Edit: People sometimes use "say" in the present as a sort of present continuous, although the act may have been in the past. "You are claiming that you'll do it (you say you'll do it), but when the time comes, you'll probably come up with some lame excuse!"