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Hello. I wrote two dialogues. Will you correct them?

No. 1

M: Have you looked out [ of ] the window this morning?
( Q. What's the difference between "looked out of the window" and "looked out the window"?)

F: No. I've been looking at my computer screen since this morning.

M: It has been snowing since last night. You can enjoy winter scenery.

No. 2

M: This survey shows [ says ] ( that ) 99 percent of the employees

at this company are satisfied with work.

F: It must be joking, right? I mean, am I only the one percent?
(Q. Where should I put "only"?)

M: Of course I doubt it. The company faked this survey, I think.

Thank you . kenta
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KentaHello. I wrote two dialogues. Will you correct them?
No. 1
M: Have you looked out [ of ] the window this morning?
( Q. What's the difference between "looked out of the window" and "looked out the window"?)
You can say either one. Whe I say this, I most frequently omit "of".
F: No. I've been looking at my computer screen since this morning.M: It has been snowing since last night. You can enjoy the winter scenery.

No. 2
M: This survey shows [ says ] (either verb is OK) ( that ) 99 percent of the employees at this company are satisfied with their work.
F: It must be joking, right? I mean, am I the only one in the one percent?
(Q. Where should I put "only"?)
M: Of course I doubt it. The company faked this survey, I think.

Comments  
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thank you, AlpheccaStars. You helped me a lot!

kenta
In a dialogue, "looked out the window" is an accurate transcription of what many people would say these days. My 87 year old mother would never say it, and I would never write it except as a quotation. It's basically the lazy omission of the "of".